The Art of Tetman Callis

Some of the stories and poems may be inappropriate for persons under 16

The Art of Tetman Callis header image 4

Entries from May 2011

Tanzen verboten

May 31st, 2011 · No Comments

“The God who gave us life, gave us liberty at the same time; the hand of force may destroy, but cannot disjoint them.” — Thomas Jefferson, 1774

[Read more →]

Tags: Lit & Crit · Politics & Law · Verandah

The rational man

May 30th, 2011 · No Comments

“I like to do things that frighten me.  When I’m afraid, I understand more things.” — David Grossman (from “The Unconsoled,” by George Packer)

[Read more →]

Tags: Lit & Crit · Verandah

Hamlet’s question recidivus

May 30th, 2011 · No Comments

“On his attaining to nirvana, Sakyamuni became the Buddha, and had no longer to mourn his being within the circle of transmigration, and could rejoice in an absolute freedom from passion, and a perfect purity. Still he continued to live on for forty-five years, till he attained to pari-nirvana, and had done with all the […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Fa-Hien · The Ancients

Geo. Washington slept here

May 30th, 2011 · No Comments

“There is a tradition that when Buddha came to North India, he came at once to this country [Udyana], and that here he left a print of his foot, which is long or short according to the ideas of the beholder on the subject. It exists, and the same thing is true about it, at […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Fa-Hien · The Ancients

A kind of desert

May 28th, 2011 · No Comments

“Mourning: a cruel country where I am no longer afraid.” — Roland Barthes, 1977. The Center for Bioethics and Humanities at SUNY Upstate Medical University publishes an annual litmag called The Healing Muse.  In their most recent issue (#10) they included my short piece, “The Take-Out,” which is the story I’m posting this week.

[Read more →]

Tags: Previously Published Stories · Words

Dream a little dream of me

May 27th, 2011 · No Comments

“The dream of artists–which is simply the dream of friends and lovers, magnified–is to plant themselves in other people’s heads.” — Tad Friend, “Sleeping with Weapons”

[Read more →]

Tags: Lit & Crit · Verandah

Horns of the dilemma

May 26th, 2011 · No Comments

“Science and literature must both occupy a great place in university education. But the former ignores sin, and the latter knows it only too well.” — The Cambridge History of English and American Literature, Vol. XIV, Ch. 14

[Read more →]

Tags: Lit & Crit · The Cambridge History of English and American Literature

Places to be

May 26th, 2011 · No Comments

“All the dreams you show up in are not your own.” — Gil Scott-Heron

[Read more →]

Tags: Lit & Crit · Verandah

You can depend on it

May 25th, 2011 · No Comments

“If a people is to be judged solely by its crimes and its sins, all the people of this planet are utterly damned.  Such judgments can produce only the deepest kind of anarchy.  The civilized judgment, on which depends all the possibilities of a decent human life, requires that men, while condemning and resisting evil […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Lippmann · Politics & Law

The road not taken

May 25th, 2011 · No Comments

“In the future, to make a fortune will be considered as improper for the head of a big business as for the President of the United States or the mayor of a city.” — Walter Lippmann, 1934

[Read more →]

Tags: Economics · Lippmann · Politics & Law

Is this why American schools are a dysfunctional mess?

May 25th, 2011 · No Comments

“In every State it should be a fundamental maxim that the education of youth should be particularly formed and adapted to the nature and end of its government.” — Thomas Sheridan, 1756 (from The Cambridge History of English and American Literature, Vol. XIV, Ch. 14)

[Read more →]

Tags: Lit & Crit · Politics & Law · The Cambridge History of English and American Literature

Job security

May 24th, 2011 · No Comments

“The history of diplomacy is the history of relations among rival powers, which did not enjoy political intimacy, and did not respond to appeals to common purposes.  Nevertheless, there have been settlements.  Some of them did not last very long.  Some of them did.  For a diplomat to think that rival and unfriendly powers cannot […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Lippmann · Politics & Law

How that thing works

May 24th, 2011 · No Comments

“Love endures only when the lovers love many things together, and not merely each other.” — Lippmann, A Preface to Morals

[Read more →]

Tags: Lippmann · Lit & Crit

Oh, come on, let them eat cake

May 23rd, 2011 · 1 Comment

“Laissez-faire is dead and the modern state has become responsible for the modern economy as a whole.  The task of insuring the continuity of the standard of life for its people is now as much the fundamental duty of the state as the preservation of national independence.” — Walter Lippmann, Godkin Lectures, 1934.

[Read more →]

Tags: Economics · Lippmann · Politics & Law

Now for something completely different

May 22nd, 2011 · No Comments

The story I’m posting this week, “The Congenital Fiance”, first appeared in Caketrain a couple of years ago.  I wrote it some years back, not long before the Umpteenth World War started.  The world wasn’t any younger or more innocent or necessarily safer or nicer in those days, but part of the world that ended […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Previously Published Stories · Words

Bargain prices in the Potemkin village

May 21st, 2011 · No Comments

“In an earlier era men like John Milton and John Stuart Mill had argued that liberty depended on a press free from censorship and intimidation.  They were concerned primarily with freedom of belief and expression.  But in modern democracies the problem was different.  The press could be ‘free’ and still fail to do its job.  […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Lippmann · Politics & Law

Vote early and often

May 20th, 2011 · No Comments

“If the voter cannot grasp the details of the problems of the day because he has not the time, the interest or the knowledge, he will not have a better public opinion because he is asked to express his opinion more often.” — Lippmann, The Phantom Public

[Read more →]

Tags: Lippmann · Politics & Law

Or about anything, for that matter?

May 20th, 2011 · No Comments

“Most political theory assumed that the average man could, if presented with the facts, make reasonable decisions.  But what if access to the facts was blocked by propaganda, ignorance and willful distortion?  How would this affect the assumption that the average man could make intelligent decisions about public issues?” — Steel, Walter Lippmann and the […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Lippmann · Politics & Law

The necessary and the sufficient

May 19th, 2011 · No Comments

“Life is an end in itself, and the only question as to whether it is worth living is whether you have had enough of it.” — Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. (from Steel’s Walter Lippmann and the American Century)

[Read more →]

Tags: Lippmann · Lit & Crit · Politics & Law · Verandah

Attribution

May 19th, 2011 · No Comments

It should be noted here and now (if not earlier) that the Lippmann quotes being posted to this site are sourced from Ronald Steel’s Walter Lippmann and the American Century, published in 1980 by the Atlantic Monthly Press.

[Read more →]

Tags: Economics · Lippmann · Lit & Crit · Politics & Law

Close the barn door, the horse is gone

May 18th, 2011 · 2 Comments

“It is labor organized that alone can stand between America and the creation of a permanent, servile class.” — Lippmann, Drift and Mastery

[Read more →]

Tags: Economics · Lippmann · Politics & Law

Brother, can you spare a bailout?

May 18th, 2011 · No Comments

“The curse of great fortunes is the degradation of the poor.” — Walter Lippmann

[Read more →]

Tags: Economics · Lippmann · Politics & Law

Needling

May 17th, 2011 · No Comments

“Once you touch the biographies of human beings, the notion that political beliefs are logically determined collapses like a pricked balloon.” — Lippmann, A Preface to Politics

[Read more →]

Tags: Lippmann · Politics & Law

You know, those were different times

May 17th, 2011 · No Comments

“The decade 1840–1850, preceding the rush to the gold-diggings, was an important period in the history of Australian poetry. The development of New South Wales brought about an increase in the number of newspapers, and the newspapers gave opportunities for the publication of verse.” — from The Cambridge History of English and American Literature, Vol. XIV, […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Lit & Crit · The Cambridge History of English and American Literature

It’s a job (or it was)

May 15th, 2011 · 2 Comments

For two years I worked as a criminal defense paralegal.  As with everything I’ve done since I was twelve or thirteen years old, I did the job with one eye on how I could milk it for stories to write.  Some might call that “bearing witness,” which would be a very nice thing to call […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Previously Published Stories · Words

Drink in your summer, gather your corn

May 13th, 2011 · No Comments

“The days and months are passing; and the years do not wait for us.” — The Analects of Confucius, Book XVII (trans. Jennings)

[Read more →]

Tags: Confucius · The Ancients

To be or not

May 12th, 2011 · No Comments

“Be clear in vision, quick in hearing, genial in expression, respectful in demeanor, true in word, serious in duty, inquiring in doubt, firmly self-controlled in anger, just and fair when the way to success opens out.” — The Analects of Confucius, Book XVI (trans. Jennings)

[Read more →]

Tags: Confucius · The Ancients

Seer suckers

May 11th, 2011 · No Comments

“Farmers without land, workers without jobs, ordinary men and women without hope, all were fodder for visionaries promising the earth.” – MacMillan, Paris 1919

[Read more →]

Tags: Economics · Lit & Crit · Politics & Law

Heathens on the downslope

May 11th, 2011 · No Comments

“The man who in his youth could show no humility or subordination, who in his prime misses his opportunity, and who when old age comes upon him will not die—that man is a miscreant.” — The Analects of Confucius, Book XIV (trans. Jennings)

[Read more →]

Tags: Confucius · The Ancients

The fallacy of misplaced intrinsic value

May 10th, 2011 · No Comments

“Dying used to be accompanied by a prescribed set of customs.  Guides to ars moriendi, the art of dying, were extraordinarily popular; a 1415 medieval Latin text was reprinted in more than a hundred editions across Europe.  Reaffirming one’s faith, repenting one’s sins, and letting go of one’s worldly possessions and desires were crucial, and […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Economics