The Art of Tetman Callis

Some of the stories and poems may be inappropriate for persons under 16

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The Book of Lamentations

First Lamentation

Remember me, I pray thee….

Evander Andrews, of the Air Force Civil Engineers,
killed in a forklift accident in Qatar.
His squadron commander knew him to be a sincere man
who got involved and took charge.
He left behind a wife, a son, and three young daughters.

John J. Edmunds, of the Army Rangers,
killed in a helicopter crash in Pakistan.
He was a young man from Wyoming.
He left a note for his wife; it read,
“Be strong while I’m gone.”

Kristofor Stonesifer, of the Army Rangers,
killed in a helicopter crash in Pakistan.
He read the philosophers, Nietzsche,
Sartre, Rorty and Kierkegaard, Freud
and Bloom and others.  He wrote essays
and journal entries of his thoughts.

. . .

Bryant Davis, of the aircraft carrier Kitty Hawk,
killed when he fell overboard in the Arabian Sea.
He said that God had called to him
to go and serve his country.
He wrote poetry and wanted someday
to run his own bowling alley.
His shipmates searched the seas
two days to try and find his body,
but he was lost.

Benjamin Johnson, of the destroyer Peterson,
killed when the Iraqi freighter he was inspecting
sank in the Persian Gulf.  The freighter
was suspected of being a smugglers’
vessel.  He and his wife planned to become
missionaries in Europe some day.

Vincent Parker, of the destroyer Peterson,
killed when the Iraqi freighter he was inspecting
sank in the Persian Gulf.  He had been
in the Navy nearly twenty years.
This was to have been his last
tour of duty before he retired.

Giovanny Maria, of the Army Mountain Division,
killed when a weapon went off in Uzbekistan.
The weapon was his own rifle, and it shot him
in his temple.  He was in the quiet spot
where he would go after his duties were through,
where he would sit and write funny stories,
letters home, and draw cartoons.

. . .

Michael Jakes, of the aircraft carrier Kitty Hawk,
killed by falling out of his bunk
and smashing his head on the warship’s hard steel.
His lieutenant said he was a mild-mannered
young man whom everyone treated
as though he were their younger brother.

Jefferson Davis, of the Army Special Forces,
killed by friendly fire in Afghanistan.
He was voted “most sweetest” twenty years
before, at his high school.  He loved
to ride his motorcycle, go fishing,
and spend time with his family.

Daniel Petithory, of the Army Special Forces,
killed by friendly fire in Afghanistan.
He was the son of a senior master
of correspondence chess.  He had no
wife, no children, but he had a brother
and a sister, and parents still living.

Brian Prosser, of the Army Special Forces,
killed by friendly fire in Afghanistan.
In a high school baseball game,
he hit a home run after he had dislocated
his shoulder, and his father had popped it
back into place.  He kept the baseball.

. . .

Nathan Chapman, of the Army Special Forces,
killed in an ambush west of Khost.
His captain said he was strong as an ox,
and always had a joke to tell
to make his comrades laugh.  In high school
he was a wrestler, and rode a dirt bike.

Nathan Hays, of Marine Corps Aerial Refueling,
killed in a tanker crash in Pakistan.
He was on the football team in high school,
and he was an Eagle Scout.

Stephen Bryson, of Marine Corps Aerial Refueling,
killed in a tanker crash in Pakistan.
It happened on the day after his birthday;
he had called his wife three times that day,
and his mother once.  He took his Bible
to war with him, and read from it every day.

Scott Germosen, of Marine Corps Aerial Refueling,
killed in a tanker crash in Pakistan.
He was so modest, he never told his mother
of the Purple Heart he earned in Beirut.
He is buried at Arlington with his
crewmates, in a single grave.  His wife
sat beside it, alone, after the funeral.
A solitary Marine stood watch.

Bryan Bertrand, of Marine Corps Aerial Refueling,
killed in a tanker crash in Pakistan.
He had just saved up enough money
to buy an electric guitar.  He played football
in college, and in high school before that.
He would have been home already, but
he volunteered for an extra tour of duty.

Daniel McCollum, of Marine Corps Aerial Refueling,
killed in a tanker crash in Pakistan.
He had been married for less than a year,
and his young wife was pregnant with their
first child.  He studied karate
and loved to go skydiving.

Jeannette Winters, of Marine Corps Aerial Refueling,
killed in a tanker crash in Pakistan.
She sang in the chorus and ran
for the track team when she was in high school.
She would not quit, even when she was in pain.
He coach asked her and she told him,
“Coach – I just can’t quit.”

Matthew Bancroft, of Marine Corps Aerial Refueling,
killed in a tanker crash in Pakistan.
A Naval Academy graduate, he held a degree
in Economics and a commission as a Marine Corps
officer.  Though it seems that it was
human error that caused his plane to go down,
his widow said that no-one can be sure.

Dwight Morgan, of Marine Corps Heavy Helicopters,
killed in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan.
He recently had been selected for promotion in rank.
He was quiet, shy, and kind.
He had a wife and a child,
with another baby on the way.

Walter Cohee, of Marine Corps Heavy Helicopters,
killed in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan.
When he was a student, he played piano and basketball,
and rode a skateboard.
He was supposed to have come home earlier from the war,
but his comrades needed him to stay and help them out.
So he did.

. . .

Jason Disney, of Army Transportation,
killed in a heavy equipment accident in Afghanistan.
He had grown from a troubled boy
into a capable young man.

J. Paul Dorrity, of Army Special Operations,
killed in a helicopter crash in the Philippines.
His cousin talked with him by telephone
the day after Christmas and told him, “We’re
praying for you.”  Paul said, “Thank you,
I don’t mind having people pray for me.”

Jody Egnor, of Army Special Operations,
killed in a helicopter crash in the Philippines.
His mother said she was his baby; his father
coached the baseball teams he played on
while he was growing up, and said his boy
was his best friend.

Jeremy Foshee, of Army Special Operations,
killed in a helicopter crash in the Philippines.
When he was still in high school, he helped
an impoverished classmate’s family
when he found they were sleeping on the floor
of an empty, unheated house.

Juan Ridout, of Air Force Special Tactics,
killed in a helicopter crash in the Philippines.
He was a straightforward and honest man,
a trained and skilled pararescueman, whose job
it was to jump from aircraft and rescue people,
sometimes by parachuting into the sea.

Kerry Frith, of Army Special Operations,
killed in a helicopter crash in the Philippines.
He was born at a Naval Air Station
nearly forty years before he lost his life.
He is buried at Arlington, just behind
Cyrus Vance, the Secretary of State.

Bartt Owens, of Army Special Operations,
killed in a helicopter crash in the Philippines.
After his body was recovered from the wreck,
sunk deep in the ocean, it was discovered
that he had taken a powerful dose of sedatives
before going on what became his final mission.

Bruce Rushforth, of Army Special Operations,
killed in a helicopter crash in the Philippines.
The spring before he died, he said the answer
to the question about time and pies
was two-forty-five, if he heard the question right.

William McDaniel, of Air Force Special Tactics,
killed in a helicopter crash in the Philippines.
His cousin refused to believe he had died,
and wondered if he were being held
in a concentration camp somewhere.

Curtis Feistner, of Army Special Operations,
killed in a helicopter crash in the Philippines.
A building at his unit’s home base
was later named after him.  He was the
youngest of three brothers, and played
soccer and tennis in high school.

Thomas Allison, of Army Special Operations,
killed in a helicopter crash in the Philippines.
He had a bright smile.  He and his
comrades were of a group of soldiers
who called themselves the Nightstalkers.

. . .

Stanley Harriman, of the Army Special Forces,
killed in combat in Afghanistan.
He loved being a soldier, was good
at it, and was the son and the brother of
soldiers.  He fell in fierce combat.

Christopher Blaschum, of the aircraft carrier John F. Kennedy,
killed when his fighter jet
crashed into the sea south of Crete.
A wheel of the jet failed on take-off.  He bailed out,
but died later from his injuries.

Bradley Crose, of the Army Rangers,
killed during a rescue mission in Afghanistan.
He was deeply religious, and loved
to read the classics, volumes of which
he took with him overseas.

John Chapman, of Air Force Special Tactics,
killed during a rescue mission in Afghanistan.
He saved the lives of the men in his team,
trading fire with the enemy at pointblank
range so his comrades could reach safety.

Jason Cunningham, of Air Force Rescue,
killed during a rescue mission in Afghanistan.
It was his first combat mission.  He remained
in the burning fuselage of his shot-down
helicopter, tending to the wounded.

Marc Anderson, of the Army Rangers,
killed during a rescue mission in Afghanistan.
He was a big man, smart and strong,
who went to college on a scholarship.
He became a teacher, then a soldier.

Matthew Commons, of the Army Rangers,
killed during a rescue mission in Afghanistan.
On his back he wore a tattoo, bigger
than your hand, of the Christian Cross.
He loved to snowboard so much,
he skipped his classes and flunked out
of college.  So he joined the Army.

Neil Roberts, of the Navy Seals,
killed during a rescue mission in Afghanistan.
His helicopter was hit and it lurched,
and he fell out.  He held off the enemy
single-handedly for long minutes, until
his machine-gun jammed.  Then
he was captured and shot.

Philip Svitak, of Army Special Operations,
killed during a rescue mission in Afghanistan.
He was a kind and gentle man.  He and
his wife were baptized together before
he was sent overseas.  His letters to her
always included verses from his
daily reading of the Bible.

Matthew Bourgeois, of the Navy Seals,
killed by a landmine in Afghanistan.
He would telephone his wife
every night, and they would talk along
a thin line of electrons stretching
halfway around the world.

. . .

Brian Craig, of Army Bomb Disposal,
killed in an explosion in Afghanistan.
He would telephone his parents early on Saturday mornings,
let them know he was all right.

Daniel Romero, of the Colorado National Guard,
killed in an explosion in Afghanistan.
He said he was tired of just
hanging around the camp, so he
volunteered that morning to go
with the Bomb Disposal team.

Justin Galewski, of Army Bomb Disposal,
killed in an explosion in Afghanistan.
He was due to come home soon,
take a safer desk job for a while.

Jamie Maugans, of Army Bomb Disposal,
killed in an explosion in Afghanistan.
On Easter Day he told his family he would
be home in a month.  He and his father
were going to have a beer or two together.

. . .

Gene Vance, of the West Virginia National Guard,
killed in an ambush in Afghanistan.
He loved to listen to the Grateful
Dead, and he loved cycling and his
new wife.  But he was a Special Forces
soldier, so he dropped out of school
and put his honeymoon on hold
when his unit was summoned to deploy.

. . .

Peter Tycz, of Army Special Forces,
killed in a gunship crash in Afghanistan.
He left behind a wife and five young
daughters, and a sister and his parents
and his friends and all of the rest of us.

Sean Corlew, of Air Force Special Operations,
killed in a gunship crash in Afghanistan.
All he ever wanted to do was fly.

Anissa Shero, of Air Force Special Operations,
killed in a gunship crash in Afghanistan.
When she was a girl, she said she never
wanted to fly, but later she changed
her mind.  She was working at a radio
station when she joined the Air Force.
There wasn’t much else for a small-
town girl from West Virginia to do.

. . .

Christopher Speer, of Army Special Operations,
killed by wounds suffered in Afghanistan.
He was a medic.  He walked into
a minefield where two hurt children
were trapped.  He treated their injuries
and helped them get to safety.
Later he was killed by a teenager
armed with a grenade.

. . .

Mark Jackson, of Army Special Forces,
killed by a bombing in the Philippines.
A lifer, a career soldier three years
shy of retirement, he was book-smart,
nice and polite, enjoyed trout fishing,
and never married.  He and five
Filipino soldiers were killed at a
restaurant by a suicide bomber
armed with a nail-packed homemade bomb.

Antonio Sledd, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in an attack in Kuwait.
Two civilians drove up to him
and gunned him down.  His comrades
tracked them down and killed them.
He had been in the country
less than two weeks.

James Ebbers, of the Army Military Police,
killed in Djibouti.
He was still a teenager,
and died of a gunshot wound.

. . .

Steven Checo, of the Army Airborne Forces,
killed by wounds from a firefight in Afghanistan.
His family asked him not to re-enlist,
but all he’d ever wanted was to be a soldier.
He came out of Washington Heights,
a tough neighborhood in Manhattan.
He would take photographs as he
parachuted out of transport planes.

. . .

Daniel Kisling, of Army Special Operations,
killed in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan.
He left a wife of fifteen years,
who thanked him for their four
beautiful children, and for loving her.

Gregory Frampton, of Army Special Operations,
killed in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan.
His mother still sees him in her dreams,
and for his wife he is her angel and her
lover forever.  Her home was in his arms.

Mark O’Steen, of Army Special Operations,
killed in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan.
He and his wife bought life insurance for him
before he left to go overseas.
The insurance company said it was sorry, but the policy
didn’t go into effect until two days
after he died.  No exceptions could be made.

Thomas Gibbons, of Army Special Operations,
killed in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan.
He and his father tore a dollar bill in half;
one kept the left half, one kept the right.
The two halves were to be rejoined
when Thomas returned from the war.

. . .

Michael Barry, of the Missouri National Guard,
killed in a vehicle accident in Qatar.
His wife also served in the Missouri
National Guard.  He was a Sergeant and
a medic, and she was a Specialist.

Rodrigo Gonzalez-Garza, of Army Aviation,
killed in a helicopter crash in Kuwait.
He was one of four brothers all serving
in the Army.  He was talkative and
energetic, always telling jokes,
always ready to pitch in and help.

Timothy Moehling, of Army Aviation,
killed in a helicopter crash in Kuwait.
He took his family on auto tours of Europe.
He smoked a pipe and put his feet up,
or sometimes relaxed in the sauna.
As a child, he flew kites along the beach.

John Smith, of Army Aviation,
killed in a helicopter crash in Kuwait.
He was a skillful rock-climber,
fluent in Italian,
devoted to his wife and daughters and to flying.
He played a game of spades before his final flight.

William Tracy, of Army Aviation,
killed in a helicopter crash in Kuwait.
He told his mother he would be safe,
but he was a man who volunteered for
every mission. His ashes were sprinkled
over Lake Winipesaukee in the spring.

. . . . . . .

Second Lamentation

I was at ease, but he hath broken me asunder: he hath also taken me by my neck, and shaken me to pieces, and set me up for his mark.  His archers compass me round about, he cleaveth my reins asunder, and doth not spare; he poureth out my gall upon the ground.  He breaketh me with breach upon breach; he runneth upon me like a giant.  I have sewed sackcloth upon my skin, and defiled my horn in the dust.  My face is foul with weeping, and on my eyelids is the shadow of death….

Spence McNeil, of Army Air Defense,
killed in a vehicle accident in Saudi Arabia.
He was a cadet in high school,
then joined the Army to work, travel,
and get a better education.
He is buried beside his grandmother,
across the road from a cornfield.

James Dillon, of Marine Corps Light Armored Reconnaissance,
killed by a self-inflicted gunshot wound in Kuwait.
His last two years of high school, he never
talked about anything else except how much
he wanted to be a Marine.

Jason Profitt, of the destroyer Deyo,
killed in an incident in the Red Sea.
He joined the Navy to pay for college,
then decided to stay through retirement,
if he could.  He had a wife
and three young children.  He played
“Risk” with his father, who says
he wants a tour when he gets to heaven.

Brian Kennedy, of Marine Corps Medium Helicopters,
killed in a helicopter crash in Kuwait.
He was his father’s only son, a college
man who became a Marine.  He gave
powerful bear hugs and played an
excellent game of lacrosse.

Jay Aubin, of Marine Corps Aviation Weapons and Tactics,
killed in a helicopter crash in Kuwait.
He was an officer so kind and friendly,
his men nicknamed him “Sweet Pea.”

Ryan Beaupre, of Marine Corps Medium Helicopters,
killed in a helicopter crash in Kuwait.
His hair was red and shiny as copper burnished.
He was quick to smile.

Kendall Waters-Bey, of Marine Corps Medium Helicopters,
killed in a helicopter crash in Kuwait.
A ten-year veteran, he joined the Marines
straight out of high school,
so he could provide for his son.
He loved to catch fish with his son.

Therrel Childers, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in action in Southern Iraq.
He was the first to die in the invasion of Iraq,
shot in the stomach during an
attack on an oil pumping station.

Jose Gutierrez, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in a firefight near Umm Qasr.
Orphaned as a boy, he dreamed of becoming
an architect after his time as a rifleman was through.

Brandon Tobler, of the Army Reserve Engineers,
killed in a vehicle accident in Iraq.
He was his parents’ only child, and told
his mother not to worry, that he
would be safe.  But a sudden dust
storm blinded the driver of his truck
and they crashed.

Eric Orlowski, of the Marine Corps Armored Forces,
killed in an accident in Iraq,
when a machine gun accidentally went off.
He loved his young daughter
more than anything in the world.

Nicolas Hodson, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in a vehicle accident in Iraq.
He told a friend that joining the Marines
was the best decision he ever made.
He thought he might make it his career.

Thomas Adams, on assignment to the Royal Navy,
killed in a helicopter crash in the Persian Gulf.
In boyhood his room was filled with
models and posters of warships and planes.
Soccer was also a passion – he went on assignment to Japan
in order to see the World Cup.

Christopher Seifert, of the Army Airborne Forces,
killed in a grenade attack
along the border between Iraq and Kuwait.
His beautiful smile would light up the day.
He was an athlete and a musician,
and an outstanding student of military history.
He was murdered by one of his comrades.

Gregory Stone, of the Idaho Air National Guard,
killed in a grenade attack
along the border between Iraq and Kuwait.
He was bright-eyed, energetic, always smiling,
always ready to get the job done.  He camped,
went skiing, spent time with his two boys,
and made the best pizza, from scratch.
He was murdered by one of his comrades.

Brian Buesing, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in action near Nasiriyah.
He was outstanding, handsome and outgoing.
At dances at his tiny school, he pulled the
wallflowers onto the floor, and together
they would dance all night.

Brendon Reiss, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in action near Nasiriyah.
He loved to swim.  He would swim
all day and into the night.  A rocket grenade
hit the troop carrier he was riding in.

Michael Williams, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in action near Nasiriyah.
He quit his successful business to enlist
in the Marines.  In boot camp his comrades
called him “Pops.”  He was big and strong,
and firm in his beliefs.

Phillip Jordan, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in action near Nasiriyah.
There was never a nicer man.  He helped
old ladies across the street.  That his
mother was killed by a drunk driver when he
was a toddler, and his father died of cancer when he
was barely a teen, you never could have guessed.

Jason Hicks, of Air Force Rescue,
killed in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan.
A short-timer, with four days left to serve before
he rotated home, he had been married
two months.  His plan was to put in
twenty years as a “lifer,” then retire
and open a seafood restaurant.

Jason Plite, of Air Force Rescue,
killed in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan.
He was a skillful artist, painter of murals,
held a black belt in karate,
and was a champion swimmer.

John Stein, of Air Force Rescue,
killed in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan.
He had served also in Germany and Iceland.
Any goal he set for himself, he attained.
Any skill he desired to possess, he mastered.

John Teal, of Air Force Rescue,
killed in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan.
A nice, quiet, generous young man,
he was soon to have been married.

Michael Maltz, of Air Force Rescue,
killed in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan.
He had his retirement papers in,
but he pulled them so he could
stay a little longer at his work.

Tamara Archuleta, of Air Force Rescue,
killed in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan.
She was brilliant, entering college
at an age when many of her peers
could not yet drive a car
or stay out late on a date.

Frederick Pokorney, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in action near Nasiriyah.
When he was a boy and his mother
and then his father left, he went to live
with the local sheriff, then with the
basketball coach.  He was tall,
strong, friendly and diligent.

Randal Rosacker, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in action near Nasiriyah.
A talented athlete in high school,
he turned down offers for college scholarships
so he could join the Marines.
He married his high school sweetheart.

Thomas Slocum, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in action near Nasiriyah.
He had some trouble with school.
His stepfather, who’d been in the Navy,
convinced him to sign up to join the Marines.
He did, and became an honor student
before he graduated.

Robert Dowdy, of Army Maintenance,
killed in an ambush near Nasiriyah.
He was a champion long-distance runner,
outrunning most of the young recruits
who were scarcely more than half his age.
He was two years shy of retirement.

Ruben Estrella-Soto, of Army Maintenance,
killed in an ambush near Nasiriyah.
He was a half-year out of boot camp
when he was sent to war.  He joined
the Army as a way to escape from
poverty, and to get an education.
He hoped to become an engineer.

James Kiehl, of Army Maintenance,
killed in an ambush near Nasiriyah.
He was tall and optimistic; his wife
was short and serious.  He gave her
a stuffed white teddy bear before he
shipped out.  He gave her one also
for their unborn child, a son.

Johnny Villareal Mata, of Army Maintenance,
killed in an ambush near Nasiriyah.
His family was close and private.
He left behind him a wife, a teenaged
son, and a younger daughter.

Lori Ann Piestewa, of Army Maintenance,
killed in an ambush near Nasiriyah.
Of the Hopi Nation, she had been
an officer cadet in high school.
She was a single mother with two
small children, pre-schoolers both.

Jamaal Addison, of Army Maintenance,
killed in an ambush near Nasiriyah.
He went to Bible study every
Wednesday night.  He was quiet
and helped his family with their computers.

Howard Johnson, of Army Maintenance,
killed in an ambush near Nasiriyah.
Only son of a Baptist minister,
seventeen years younger than his
youngest sister, he used to
shine the shoes of his friends who were
too poor to afford their own polish.

Brandon Sloan, of Army Maintenance,
killed in an ambush near Nasiriyah.
He left high school before he graduated,
so that he could join the Army.
He liked to lift weights.

Donald Walters, of Army Maintenance,
captured in an ambush near Nasiriyah,
later executed by his captors.
They stabbed him to death.
He had served in the previous war;
after he came home from that, he was
tormented by nightmares.  He left active
duty for a while, but re-enlisted to help
support his family.  He was a cook.

Edward Anguiano, of Army Combat Support,
killed in a convoy ambush in Iraq.
He grew up in a small town
in the Rio Grande Valley, one of the several
children of a single mother.  It was a month
after he went missing in action
before his remains were recovered and identified.

George Buggs, of Army Forward Support,
killed in a convoy ambush in Iraq.
He was raised by his grandfather,
and was quiet, competent, and focused.

Jonathan Gifford, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in action near Nasiriyah.
It was ten years after he graduated from high school
before he fulfilled his dream of joining the Marines.
He was a Private and a rifleman when he died.

Patrick Nixon, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in action near Nasiriyah.
He wanted someday to raise a family,
own a few horses, and teach history.

Michael Bitz, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in action near Nasiriyah.
He had twin children who were born
after he went to war.  He had two other,
older children, and had joined the Marines
to focus his life.  The day he died,
he kept his comrades supplied with ammo
and helped the wounded,
until he was killed by a rocket grenade.

David Fribley, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in action near Nasiriyah.
He had a college degree in recreation and
sports management, and he organized activities
at an old folks’ home, until the war
broke out.  Then he joined the Marines.
“This is my gift to you,” he said.

Jose Garibay, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in action near Nasiriyah.
His mother called him Angel, and sent him
boxes of sweets.  She was very proud
to have a Marine for a son.  He wrote her
and asked her to take good care
of his niece, and watch over her.

Jorge Gonzalez, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in action near Nasiriyah.
His parents discovered he was dead
when they saw his corpse on television news.
“When I saw the face,” his mother
said, “It was that of my son.”

Tamario Burkett, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in action near Nasiriyah.
He was a poet and an artist and a big brother
with six younger brothers and sisters.

Kemaphoom Chanawongse, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in action near Nasiriyah.
He came to America when he was
nine years old.  He grew up, went to high school,
played soccer, and joined the Marines.
He called himself “The Thai import
with the baby face.”

Donald Cline, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in action near Nasiriyah.
No one knows for certain how he died.
Most likely he was guarding wounded comrades
when he was accidentally attacked
by one of his own Air Force’s
tank-destroying aircraft.

Nolen Hutchings, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in action near Nasiriyah.
His truck was accidentally attacked
by a warplane from his own Air Force,
and utterly destroyed.

Evan James, of the Marine Corps Engineers,
killed by drowning in the Saddam Canal.
He was such a good swimmer, his friends back home
were shocked that he would die this way.
Seventy days before he drowned
he was still a sophomore in college,
studying to be a physical fitness trainer.

Bradley Korthaus, of the Marine Corps Engineers,
killed by drowning in the Saddam Canal.
He served four years in the Marines after
he got out of high school,
then he joined the Reserves.  When war came,
he was called up.  He was planning on getting
married after he returned from Iraq.

Gregory Sanders, of the Army Armored Forces,
killed in action in Iraq.
He wanted to be a soldier
almost as soon as he could say
his first words, a toddler
in diapers and a camouflage t-shirt.

Thomas Blair, of Marine Corps Air Defense,
killed in action near Nasiriyah.
He was caught in a crossfire
while trying to rescue his comrades.
No one knows exactly what happened,
since they all were killed, hit by
enemy rocket grenades and friendly
armor-piercing missiles.  Thomas
was from the town of Broken Arrow.

Donald May, of the Marine Corps Armored Forces,
killed in convoy operations near the Euphrates River.
Both of his parents had been Marines.
He was a Naval Cadet, then a military
policeman, and finally a tank commander,
just as his father had been.

Patrick O’Day, of the Marine Corps Armored Forces,
killed in convoy operations near the Euphrates River.
He was a tank gunner and proud of it.
He married his high school sweetheart,
they conceived a child, he shipped out to war,
and he died.

Francisco Martinez Flores, of the Marine Corps Armored Forces,
killed in convoy operations near the Euphrates River.
His tank fell into the river when the bridge
it was crossing collapsed.  He wanted someday
to be a stockbroker, or maybe a detective.
He was two weeks shy of becoming
a citizen of the nation he died defending.

Michael Johnson, of the Naval Medical Services,
killed in action while tending to the wounded in Iraq.
He loved to draw
and he loved to play basketball.

Kevin Nave, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in a vehicle accident in Iraq.
A football player and wrestler back in his
high-school days, he had a degree
in Political Science, a wife, a young
son, and a young daughter.

Robert Rodriguez, of the Marine Corps Armored Forces,
killed in action near the Euphrates River.
He was the baby of his family
and wanted to make them proud.
His body was decorated with tattoos of
flags, and with a tattoo of the flower
amaryllis, after his mother’s name.

Joseph Menusa, of the Marine Corps Combat Engineers,
killed in an ambush in Iraq.
He was born in the Philippines
but lived most of his life in the United States.
He served nearly fifteen years in the Marines,
and was given citizenship after he died.

Jesus Suarez del Solar, of Marine Corps Light Armored Reconnaissance,
killed in action in Iraq.
His father brought the family
to the United States from Mexico,
so that Jesus might become a Marine.

Roderic Solomon, of the Army Infantry,
killed in a vehicle accident in Iraq.
He had served on active duty before,
then got out for a while but wanted back in.
The Army said no.  They said he was too old,
had too many children.  He kept at them
until they took him back.  They put him in
the Infantry.  He took good care of his men,
making sure they had the proper body armor.

Fernando Padilla-Ramirez, of Marine Corps Air Support,
killed in convoy operations near Nasiriyah.
He was training to become a police officer
when war came and took him away.
His youngest son was born
a week after he shipped out.

Jacob Frazier, of the Illinois National Guard,
killed in an ambush in Afghanistan.
His father said the colors of his son’s
death were as a rainbow to him, shifting
from blue and green, silver and gold,
through black, black, and black, into red,
white and blue, and finally into
nothing, nothing left at all.

Orlando Morales, of the Army Special Forces,
killed in an ambush in Afghanistan.
He and his team were being shown
a new school and clinic built with
American help, when they were attacked.

James Cawley, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in a vehicle accident in Iraq.
He was a police detective and a
member of the Reserves.
Before the war broke out and he was called up,
he worked on a city gang unit
and in Special Weapons and Tactics.

William White, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in a vehicle accident in Iraq.
His discharge was delayed by the war.
His father offered to help him be excused
from overseas duty, but he wouldn’t
have any of that.  After he shipped out,
he sent money home to his family,
and advice for his kid brother.

Michael Weldon, of the Army Infantry,
killed in a suicide bombing near Najaf.
His mother had been a Sergeant Major.
She was very proud of him.  He helped her keep
her household running after
her divorce.  He enjoyed lifting
weights and working on his truck.

Michael Curtin, of the Army Infantry,
killed in a suicide bombing near Najaf.
He played football all four years
he was in high school.  He never started
a game, but he never missed a practice.
On Saturday nights, he preferred
the company of a good book over
a wild night out on the town.

Diego Rincon, of the Army Infantry,
killed in a suicide bombing near Najaf.
He was a teenager with a beautiful car.
He loved that car.  He was killed by the driver
of a taxi, who waved for help,
then blew up himself, his taxi,
and Diego and his comrades.

Eugene Williams, of the Army Infantry,
killed in a suicide bombing near Najaf.
He loved to sing rhythm and blues.
He was looking forward to coming home,
so he could cook a good meal for his family,
and work some more on his music.

Michael Lalush, of the Marine Corps Light Attack Helicopters,
killed in a helicopter crash in Iraq.
This man could build things, and he could make things.
He could rebuild lawn mower and automobile engines.
He knew woodworking, and he knew
how to weld.  He loved his work and intended
to make the military his life.

Aaron Contreras, of the Marine Corps Light Attack Helicopters,
killed in a helicopter crash in Iraq.
He was a devoutly religious man who knew the Bible very well.
He was born on the Fourth of July,
during the closing years of the Vietnam War.

Brian McGinnis, of the Marine Corps Light Attack Helicopters,
killed in a helicopter crash in Iraq.
His high school wrestling coach
tried to talk him into going to college,
but he said no, he wanted to join the Marines,
because they were the best, he said,
and he wanted to be one of the best.

Brandon Rowe, of the Army Airborne Forces,
killed in action in Ayyub.
He wrote his mother to ask
for extra little supplies and things.
He told her that her letters
were as precious to him as gold.

William Jeffries, of the Indiana National Guard,
killed by an illness contracted in Kuwait.
Not a young man any longer,
he was felled by a blood clot
that formed in his lung.

. . . . . . .

Third Lamentation

By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept….

Jacob Butler, of the Army Infantry,
killed by a rocket grenade in Assamawah.

Joseph Maglione, of the Marine Corps Engineers,
killed when a weapon went off in Kuwait.

Brian Anderson, of Marine Corps Light Armored Reconnaissance,
killed in a vehicle accident near Nasiriyah.

George Fernandez, of Army Special Operations,
killed in action in northern Iraq.

Christian Gurtner, of Marine Corps Light Armored Reconnaissance,
killed when a weapon went off in southern Iraq.

Nathan White, of the aircraft carrier Kitty Hawk,
killed when his fighter plane was lost over Iraq.

James Adamouski, of Army Aviation,
killed in a helicopter crash in central Iraq.

Mathew Boule, of Army Aviation,
killed in a helicopter crash in central Iraq.

Erik Halvorsen, of Army Aviation,
killed in a helicopter crash in central Iraq.

Scott Jamar, of Army Aviation,
killed in a helicopter crash in central Iraq.

Michael Pedersen, of Army Aviation,
killed in a helicopter crash in central Iraq.

Eric Smith, of Army Aviation,
killed in a helicopter crash in central Iraq.

Chad Bales, of Marine Corps Transportation,
killed in a vehicle accident
east of Ash Shahin.

Mark Evnin, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in a firefight in central Iraq.

Donald Oaks, of Army Rocket Artillery,
killed in action in Iraq.

Randall Rehn, of Army Rocket Artillery,
killed in action in Iraq.

Todd Robbins, of Army Rocket Artillery,
killed in action in Iraq.

Nino Livaudais, of the Army Rangers,
killed in a car-bombing in Iraq.

Ryan Long, of the Army Rangers,
killed in a car-bombing in Iraq.

Russell Rippetoe, of the Army Rangers,
killed in a car-bombing in Iraq.

Erik Silva, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in action in Iraq.

Wilbert Davis, of the Army Armored Forces,
killed in a vehicle accident in central Iraq.

Edward Korn, of the Army Armored Forces,
killed while reconnoitering in central Iraq.

Benjamin Sammis, of the Marine Corps Light Attack Helicopters,
killed in a combat helicopter crash
near Ali Aziziyal.

Travis Ford, of the Marine Corps Light Attack Helicopters,
killed in a combat helicopter crash
near Ali Aziziyal.

Wilfred Bellard, of the Army Field Artillery,
killed in a vehicle accident in Iraq.

Daniel Cunningham, of the Army Field Artillery,
killed in a vehicle accident in Iraq.

Devon Jones, of the Army Field Artillery,
killed in a vehicle accident in Iraq.

Paul Smith, of the Army Engineers,
killed in action in Iraq.

Tristan Aitken, of the Army Field Artillery,
killed in action in Iraq.

Bernard Gooden, of the Marine Corps Armored Forces,
killed in a firefight in central Iraq.

Brian McPhillips, of the Marine Corps Armored Forces,
killed in a firefight in central Iraq.

Duane Rios, of the Marine Corps Combat Engineers,
killed in a firefight in central Iraq.

Larry Brown, of the Army Infantry,
killed in action in Iraq.

Stevon Booker, of the Army Armored Forces,
killed in action while on a raid into Baghdad.

Edward Smith, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in action in central Iraq.

Kelley Prewitt, of the Army Armored Forces,
killed in action in Iraq.

Gregory Huxley, of the Army Engineers,
killed in action in Iraq.

William Watkins, of the Air Force Fighter Forces,
killed in action when his fighter plane went down in Iraq.

Eric Das, of the Air Force Fighter Forces,
killed in action when his fighter plane went down in Iraq.

George Mitchell, of the Army Infantry,
killed in a rocket attack south of Baghdad.

Lincoln Hollinsaid, of the Army Engineers,
killed in action in Iraq.

Andrew Aviles, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in action in central Iraq.

Jesus Medellin, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in action in central Iraq.

Jeffrey Kaylor, of the Army Field Artillery,
killed in action in Iraq.

Anthony Miller, of the Army Infantry,
killed in action in Iraq.

Scott Sather, of Air Force Special Tactics,
killed in action in Iraq.

Juan Garza, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in action in central Iraq.

Robert Stever, of the Army Infantry,
killed in action in Iraq.

Jason Meyer, of the Army Engineers,
killed in action in Iraq.

John Marshall, of the Army Infantry,
killed by a rocket grenade
during an ambush in Baghdad.

Henry Brown, of the Army Field Artillery,
killed by wounds received
in action south of Baghdad.

Terry Hemingway, of the Army Infantry,
killed when a car he was passing
exploded in a street in Iraq.

Jeffrey Bohr, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in combat in northern Baghdad.

Riayan Tejeda, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed in combat in northeast Baghdad.

David Owens, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed by wounds received
in action in central Iraq.

Jesus Gonzalez, of the Marine Corps Armored Forces,
killed while on duty
at a checkpoint in Baghdad.

Gil Mercado, of the Army Airborne Forces,
killed when a weapon went off in Iraq.

Jason Mileo, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed by a fellow soldier
when he was mistaken for an enemy near Baghdad.

Richard Goward, of the Michigan National Guard,
killed in a truck accident
during a dust storm in Iraq.

Ariel Gonzalez, of Marine Corps Aerial Support,
killed when a tanker airplane
collapsed on him at a base in southern Iraq.

Thomas Foley, of Army Air Defense,
killed when a grenade exploded
inside his vehicle in Iraq.

John Brown, of Army Air Defense,
killed when a grenade exploded
inside his vehicle in Iraq.

Joseph Mayek, of the Army Infantry,
killed by friendly fire
from a heavy machinegun in Iraq.

John Rivero, of the Florida National Guard,
killed in a vehicle accident in Kuwait.

Russell Buckley, of the Army Reserves,
killed when he fell from a truck in a convoy.

Andrew Arnold, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed by a rocket grenade
during a training accident in Kut.

Robert Channell, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed by a rocket grenade
during a training accident in Kut.

Alan Lam, of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces,
killed by a rocket grenade
during a training accident in Kut.

Troy Jenkins, of the Army Infantry,
killed by wounds received
while on dismounted patrol in Iraq.

Narson Sullivan, of the Army Military Police,
killed in Iraq when his rifle went off.

Osbaldo Orozco, of the Army Infantry,
killed in a vehicle accident
while hurrying into combat.

Jerod Dennis, of the Army Airborne Forces,
killed in an ambush in Afghanistan.

Joe Garza, of the Army Infantry,
killed in a traffic accident in Baghdad.

Raymond Losano, of Air Force Support Operations,
killed by wounds received in Afghanistan.

. . .

Jesse Givens, killed when his tank
fell into the Euphrates.

Sean Reynolds, killed in Iraq when his weapon went off.

Jason Deibler, killed when a weapon went off in Kuwait.

Marlin Rockhold, killed by a sniper
while directing traffic in Baghdad.

Richard Carl, killed when his ambulance helicopter
crashed into the Tigris.

Hans Gukeisen, killed when his ambulance helicopter
crashed into the Tigris.

Brian Van Dusen, killed when his ambulance helicopter
crashed into the Tigris.

Cedric Bruns, killed in a vehicle accident in Kuwait.

Matthew Smith, killed in a vehicle accident in Kuwait.

Jose Gonzalez Rodriguez, killed in an explosives accident in Iraq.

Jakub Kowalik, killed in an explosives accident in Iraq.

Patrick Griffin, killed when a bomb exploded near Diwaniyah.

Nicholas Kleiboeker, killed in a munitions explosion near Hillah.

David Nutt, killed in a vehicle accident in Mosul.

William Payne, killed in an ordnance explosion in Haswah.

John Taylor, killed by a heart attack
during training in Afghanistan.

Rasheed Sahib, killed when a weapon went off in Balad.

Douglas Marenco Reyes, killed in a vehicle accident near Samawah.

Dominic Baragona, killed in a vehicle accident in Iraq.

Kirk Straseskie, killed by drowning while attempting to rescue crewmen
of a helicopter that crashed into the Shatt al Hillah Canal.

Aaron White, killed in a helicopter crash
in the Shatt al Hillah Canal.

Timothy Ryan, killed in a helicopter crash
in the Shatt al Hillah Canal.

Jason Moore, killed in a helicopter crash
in the Shatt al Hillah Canal.

Andrew La Mont, killed in a helicopter crash
in the Shatt al Hillah Canal.

Nathaniel Caldwell, killed in a vehicle accident in Baghdad.

David Evans, killed in an ammunition factory explosion
in Diwaniyah.

Keman Mitchell, killed when he drowned in Kirkuk.

Mathew Schram, killed by enemy fire in Hadithah.

Kenneth Nalley, killed in a vehicle accident in Samawah.

Brett Petriken, killed in a vehicle accident in Samawah.

Jeremiah Smith, killed when his vehicle hit
an unexploded bomb in Baghdad.

Thomas Broomhead, killed while on sentry duty in Fallujah.

Michael Quinn, killed while on sentry duty in Fallujah.

Jose Perez, killed in a convoy ambush in Taji.

Kenneth Bradley, killed by a heart attack in Baqubah.

Zachariah Long, killed in a vehicle accident near Mosul.

Michael Gleason, killed in a vehicle accident near Mosul.

Kyle Griffin, killed in a vehicle accident near Mosul.

Jonathan Lambert, killed by injuries suffered
in a vehicle accident in Iraq.

Atanasio Marin, killed by the enemy south of Balad.

Branden Oberleitner, killed by a rocket grenade
while on patrol in Fallujah.

Travis Burkhardt, killed in a traffic accident in Baghdad.

David Sisung, killed by injuries suffered
while on duty in the Persian Gulf.

Doyle Bollinger, killed by an ordnance explosion.

Jesse Halling, killed during an attack
on a police station in Tikrit.

Michael Dooley, killed by civilians masquerading
as seekers of medical help in Asad.

Gavin Neighbor, killed in Baghdad by a rocket grenade
fired from somebody’s house.

John Klinesmith, killed in the lake
of the palace compound in Fallujah.

Andrew Pokorny, killed in a vehicle accident in Asad.

Ryan Cox, killed when a weapon went off near Najaf.

Joseph Suell, killed in Todjie.

Shawn Pahnke, killed by a sniper
while on patrol in Baghdad.

Michael Tosto, killed in Kuwait
by a terrible pneumonia.

Robert Frantz, killed by a grenade
thrown over a wall in Baghdad.

Michael Deuel, killed by gunfire
while on sentry duty in Baghdad.

William Latham, killed by shrapnel wounds
received in a market in Ramadi.

Paul Nakamura, killed by enemy fire in Iskandariyah.

Orenthial Smith, killed in a convoy ambush in Baghdad.

Cedric Lennon, killed in Baghdad.

Thomas Retzer, killed in Afghanistan.

Gregory MacDonald, killed in a vehicle accident in Iraq.

Andrew Chris, killed by wounds received in Iraq.

Joshua McIntosh, killed by a gunshot in Karbala.

Corey Hubbell, killed by a respiratory illness contracted in Kuwait.

Richard Orengo, killed by enemy fire in Najaf.

Tomas Sotelo, killed in a convoy ambush in Baghdad.

Kelvin Gutierrez, killed in a vehicle accident
in Afghanistan.

Gladimir Philippe, killed in action in Iraq.

Kevin Ott, killed in action in Iraq.

Timothy Conneway, killed by an explosion in Baghdad.

Christopher Coffin, killed in a traffic accident in Iraq.

Travis Bradach-Nall, killed in an explosion near Karbala
during the clearing of a minefield.

Corey Small, killed in Iraq.

Edward Herrgott, killed by gunfire
while on patrol in Baghdad.

Jeffrey Wershow, killed by gunfire in Baghdad.

David Parson, killed by gunfire in a house in Baghdad.

Chad Keith, killed in Baghdad.

Barry Sanford, killed in Balad.

Robert McKinley, killed by heat stroke
suffered in Iraq.

Craig Boling, killed in Kuwait
when he collapsed and died while eating
with his comrades.

Christopher Geiger, killed by a heart attack in Afghanistan.

Jason Tetrault, killed in a vehicle accident in Kuwait.

Roger Rowe, killed by a sniper in Iraq.

Melissa Valles, killed by injuries received in Balad.

Dan Gabrielson, killed in a convoy ambush in Baqubah.

Christian Schulz, killed by injuries received in Baqubah.

Joshua Neusche, killed by pneumonia contracted in Iraq.

Jaror Puello-Coronado, killed in a traffic accident in Iraq.

Paul Cassidy, killed by injuries received at Camp Babylon.

Michael Crockett, killed by a rocket grenade attack
while on patrol in Baghdad.

Cory Geurin, killed in a fall from the palace roof in Babylon.

Ramon Reyes Torres, killed while taking cover
from a car-bomb explosion in Baghdad.

David Moreno, killed by a gunshot in Hamishiyah.

Mason Whetstone, killed by injuries received in Baghdad.

Joel Bertoldie, killed by a landmine explosion in Fallujah.

Jonathan Rozier, killed during an attack
on the bank his unit was guarding in Baghdad.

Christopher Willoughby, killed in a vehicle accident in Baghdad.

Justin Garvey, killed when his vehicle was struck
by a rocket grenade at Tallifar.

Jason Jordan, killed when his vehicle was struck
by a rocket grenade at Tallifar.

David Scott, killed by an aneurysm while serving in Doha.

Mark Bibby, killed by a landmine explosion in Baghdad.

Jon Fettig, killed when his truck was hit
by a rocket grenade near Ramadi.

Joshua Byers, killed in a landmine explosion
just outside Ramadi.

Brett Christian, killed when his convoy was attacked
by rocket grenades in Mosul.

Juan Serrano, killed by injuries received
in a vehicle mishap in Baghdad.

Evan Ashcraft, killed in a convoy ambush north of Hawd.

Raheen Heighter, killed in a convoy ambush north of Hawd.

Hector Perez, killed in a convoy ambush north of Hawd.

Daniel Methvin, killed by a grenade thrown from the window
of the hospital he was guarding in Baqubah.

Jonathan Barnes, killed by a grenade thrown from the window
of the hospital he was guarding in Baqubah.

Wilfredo Perez, killed by a grenade thrown from the window
of the hospital he was guarding in Baqubah.

Jonathan Cheatham, killed when his convoy was attacked
by rocket grenades in Baghdad.

Heath McMillin, killed by rocket grenades and small-arms fire
while on patrol south of Baghdad.

Nathaniel Hart, killed in a vehicle accident in Tillil.

William Maher, killed in a landmine explosion in Baghdad.

Leif Nott, killed by hostile fire in Belaruz.

Michael Deutsch, killed in a landmine explosion in Baghdad.

James Lambert, killed by a stray bullet in Baghdad.

Justin Hebert, killed by a rocket grenade in Kirkuk.

David Loyd, killed by heart failure in Kuwait.

Farao Letufuga, killed by falling from a building
while on guard duty in Mosul.

Brian Hellermann, killed by wounds received
during an ambush in Baghdad.

Leonard Simmons, killed by a heart attack in Mosul.

Kyle Gilbert, killed by wounds received
during an ambush in Baghdad.

Zeferino Colunga, killed by medical complications
suffered while in Iraq.

Duane Longstreth, killed by injuries received in Iraq.

Matthew Bush, killed by heatstroke in Iraq.

Brandon Ramsey, killed in a vehicle accident in Tallil.

Levi Kinchen, killed when he died in his sleep in Iraq.

. . .

Floyd Knighten, killed by the terrible August heat
David Perry, killed when a package exploded
Richard Eaton, killed in his sleep by a pulmonary embolism
Daniel Parker, killed when he was thrown from a swerving vehicle
Timmy Brown, killed by a roadside bomb
Taft Williams, killed by a homemade landmine
Steven White, killed by an antitank landmine
David Kirchhoff, killed by heatstroke
Craig Ivory, killed by a stroke
Eric Hull, killed by a homemade landmine
David Tapper, killed by gunfire during an ambush
Bobby Franklin, killed by a roadside bomb
Kenneth Harris, killed in a traffic mishap
Michael Adams, killed in a burning building
Kylan Jones-Huffman, killed by a gunman while driving down the road
Stephen Scott, killed by a gunshot wound
Vorn Mack, killed by drowning in the Euphrates
Ronald Allen, killed by a vehicle while changing a tire
Pablo Manzano, killed when a weapon went off
Darryl Dent, killed by a homemade bomb
Gregory Belanger, killed by a homemade bomb
Rafael Navea, killed by a homemade bomb
Anthony Sherman, killed by a blood clot
Mitchell Lane, killed in a fall while infiltrating an enemy cave
Mark Lawton, killed by a rocket grenade
Sean Cataudella, killed in a vehicle mishap
Adam Thomas, killed in a firefight
Chad Fuller, killed in a firefight

. . .

Charles Caldwell, killed south of Baghdad
Joseph Camara, killed south of Baghdad
Cameron Sarno, killed in Kuwait City
Christopher Sisson, killed in Baghdad
Bruce Brown, killed near Udeid in Qatar
Jarrett Thompson, killed in a convoy in Iraq
Ryan Carlock, killed northwest of Baghdad
Joseph Robsky, killed in Baghdad
Henry Ybarra, killed in Balad
William Bennett, killed in Ramadi
Kevin Morehead, killed in Ramadi
Trevor Blumberg, killed in Fallujah
Alyssa Peterson, killed near Tel Afar
Kevin Kimmerly, killed in Baghdad
Brian Faunce, killed in Asad
James Wright, killed in Tikrit
Richard Arriaga, killed in Tikrit
Anthony Thompson, killed in Tikrit
David Friedrich, killed in Abu Ghraib
Lunsford Brown, killed in Abu Ghraib
Frederick Miller, killed in Ramadi
Paul Sturino, killed in Quest in Iraq
Michael Andrade, killed by injuries received in Balad
Robert Lucero, killed in Tikrit
Kyle Thomas, killed in Tikrit
Robert Rooney, killed in Shuabai Port in Kuwait
Joseph Baddick, killed near Abu Ghraib Prison
Evan O’Neill, killed in Afghanistan
Kristian Parker, killed in Qatar
Darrin Potter, killed near Abu Ghraib Prison
Christopher Cutchall, killed west of Baghdad
Dustin McGaugh, killed in Balad

. . .

James Blankenbecler, killed at age forty
Analaura Esparza Gutierrez, killed at age twenty-one
Paul Kimbrough, killed at age forty-four
Simeon Hunte, killed at age twenty-three
Tamarra Ramos, killed at age twenty-four
Charles Sims, killed at age eighteen
James Pirtle, killed at age twenty-seven
Spencer Karol, killed at age twenty
Richard Torres, killed at age twenty-five
Kerry Scott, killed at age twenty-one
Darrell Jones, killed at age twenty-two
Joseph Norquist, killed at age twenty-six
Sean Silva, killed at age twenty-three
Christopher Swisher, killed at age twenty-six
James Powell, killed at age twenty-six
Stephen Wyatt, killed at age nineteen
Donald Wheeler, killed at age twenty-two
Jose Casanova, killed at age twenty-three
Benjamin Freeman, killed at age nineteen
Douglas Weismantle, killed at age twenty-eight
Kim Orlando, killed at age forty-three
Sean Grilley, killed at age twenty-four
Joseph Bellavia, killed at age twenty-eight
Michael Williams, killed at age forty-six
David Bernstein, killed at age twenty-four
John Hart, killed at age twenty
Paul Johnson, killed at age twenty-nine
Paul Bueche, killed at age nineteen
Jason Ward, killed at age twenty-five
John Johnson, killed at age twenty-four
John Teal, killed at age thirty-one
Jose Mora, killed at age twenty-six
Artimus Brassfield, killed at age twenty-two
Michael Hancock, killed at age twenty-nine
Jamie Huggins, killed at age twenty-six
Rachel Bosveld, killed at age nineteen
Joseph Guerrera, killed at age twenty
Charles Buehring, killed at age forty
Steven Acosta, killed at age nineteen
Aubrey Bell, killed at age thirty-three
Jonathan Falaniko, killed at age twenty
Isaac Campoy, killed at age twenty-one
Algernon Adams, killed at age thirty-six
Michael Paul Barrera, killed at age twenty-six
Paul Sweeney, killed at age thirty-two
Todd Bryant, killed at age twenty-three

. . .

Joshua Hurley Benjamin Colgan Maurice Johnson Brian Penisten Bruce Smith Daniel Bader Ernest Bucklew Steven Conover Anthony D’Agostino Darius Jennings Karina Lau Keelan Moss Ross Pennanen Brian Slavenas Paul Velazquez Frances Vega Joe Wilson Joel Perez Rayshawn Johnson Robert Benson Francisco Martinez Jose Rivera James Wolf Paul Fisher James Chance Kyran Kennedy Paul Neff Scott Rose Benedict Smith Morgan Kennon Sharon Swartworth Cornell Gilmore Mark Vasquez Kurt Frosheiser Gary Collins Linda Jimenez Nicholas Tomko Marlon Jackson Genaro Acosta Nathan Bailey Robert Wise Joseph Minucci Jacob Fletcher Irving Medina Jay Blessing Michael Acklin Ryan Baker William Dusenbery Warren Hansen Eugene Uhl Sheldon Hawk Eagle Erik Kesterson Jeremiah DiGiovanni Damian Heidelberg Kelly Bolor John Russell Scott Saboe Timothy Hayslett John Sullivan Jeremy Wolfe Richard Hafer Pierre Piche Joey Whitener James Shull Alexander Coulter Nathan Dalley Dale Panchot Scott Tyrrell Joseph Lister George Wood Gary Coleman Robert Roberts Damian Bushart Darrell Smith Christopher Nason Howard Walters Phillip Albert Steven Plumhoff Thomas Walkup William Kerwood Jerry Wilson Rel Ravago Eddie Menyweather David Goldberg Thomas Sweet Ariel Rico Aaron Sissel Stephen Bertolino

Mosul Baghdad Fallujah Tikrit
Fallujah Fallujah Fallujah
Mumudyah Husaybah Tikrit

Tikrit Mosul Fallujah Baghdad
Tampa and Taji, both in Iraq
Camp Arifjan in Kuwait

Tikrit Mosul Fallujah Fallujah
Baghdad Samara Baghdad Mosul
Asadabad in Afghanistan

Mosul Baghdad Baqubah Ramadi
Balad Tikrit Ramadi Baqubah
Dihok Baghdad Qayyarah Mosul

Mosul Baqubah Mosul Mosul
somewhere in Afghanistan
Junction City and Haditha, both in Iraq

Tikrit Fallujah Baghdad Mosul

. . .

Uday Clarence Ryan Raphael Arron Ray Steven
Joseph Christopher Jason Richard Aaron Jerrick Todd
Marshall Jeffrey Jarrod Rian
Kimberly Kenneth Nathan
Christopher Glenn Charles Edward Stuart
Theodore Michael Eric
Christopher Christopher Benjamin Thomas
Stephen Michael Charles Michael
Rey Curt Ernesto Justin

Dennis Eric Kimberly Solomon Marc Luke Jesse
Nathaniel Gregory Jeffrey Craig
Philip Ian Aaron Michael
Christopher Roy Ricky Keicia Roland Edmond Larry
Cody Kelly Gabriel James
Brian Michael Jason William
Randy Ervin Keith Kenneth Christopher Adam Patrick
Lester Matthew James Travis
Luke Cory Sean Luis
Benjamin Robert Shawn Adam
Curtis Danton James Justin
Eliu Juan Holly

Armando Roger Seth Joshua Richard Thomas Elijah Jude
William Patrick Eric
Bryan Nicholes Nichole
Michael Christopher Roger Jeffrey Henry David Stephen Matthew

Michael Michael Gussie Matthew
Richard Edward Bert Christopher Joe
John Jason Jocelyn
Joel Daniel Clint William Michael Thomas Ivory Tracy
Harold Andrew Michael Anthony
Rick Brandon Doron Richard
David Jason Michael Mark Matthew
Dustin Christopher Bruce Andrew Wentz James Jeffrey
Adam Leroy Timothy Dennis Sean Jeremiah
Richard William Brandon Cleston
Michael Sean Doyle

. . .

Michael means he who is like unto God
Christopher means the bearer of the anointed
Sean means the gracious gift of God
William means the resolute guardian
Richard means the ruler who is strong

. . .

Dustin William Philip
Tyler Geoffrey Aric Michael Yihjyh
Yihjyh also called Eddie
from Saipan in the Marianas
where the Marines landed in ‘44 and fought a bloody battle
against the forces of Imperial Japan

Robert Stephen Ahmed
Israel Forest Casey John Moises Matthew David
Shane Jesse Christopher Scott
Benjamin Marcus Ryan Travis
Kyle Allan Anthony Christopher Lee
Fernando Gerardo Deryk John
Brent Christopher Marvin Tyanna
William George Christopher Michael Joshua Michael William
Nicholas Levi Phillip
Elias Michael Matthew Jonathan Felix Allen Chance
Eric Don Michelle Elmer Toby
Gregory Raymond Peter
Antoine John Justin William
Adolfo Daniel Torrey Michael George Oscar Lawrence Wesley
Nathan Brad Robert Adrian Kevin Noah Victor
Frank Christopher Richard Jimmy Brian Gary Ruben Michael
Richard Jonathan Robert Edward Michael
Dennis Marvin Clayton Herbert Christopher Leroy Bradley Christopher
Patrick Jason Shawn Cory Stacey Billy Patrick
Arthur Nathan Christopher Michael Kenneth Lawrence Sherwood Aaron
Abraham Marquis
Jacob Kendall Adam
Ricardo Norman Ryan Justin James Ryan Jeffrey
Esau Landis Martin Joshua Scott Christopher Jason

Ramon Oscar Phillip Joshua Trevor Jeremy Ervin John
Ronald Robert Scott
Trace Michael Todd Ronald
Erickson Lyndon Gregory Marvin
Christopher Bradley James Brandon Jesse Jeffrey Hesley
Dustin Ronald Isela
Chase James Philip Rodney Andrew Kyle
Jeremiah Jeffrey Brian Brandon
James Edward Brud Philip
Michelangelo Bruce Pedro Rene
Leonard Carl Mark Bob
Michael William
William was fifty-nine years old
and serving in the National Guard
when he died

Marcos Joseph Michael
Rudy Troy Leslie
Leslie was eighteen years old
and serving in the Cavalry
when she died

Jeremy Andrew Jeremy
Jorge Owen Beau James Richard Daniel Kevin
Alan Dominique
Kyle Matthew Michael Brian Daniel Joseph Robert
Raphael Benjamin Cody
Kenneth Charles Bradli Aaron
Nicholaus Robert Dustin

. . .

Dustin means the valiant warrior
Robert means he whose fame is shining brightly
Jason means he who is a healer

. . .

Marcus Bum Todd Christopher Frank Justin Justin
Erik Ryan Humberto Melissa
Melvin Jeremy David Jamie Humayun Thomas
Eric Shawn Paul Arthur Jeremy
Jason Thai Sean Russell Marvin
Juan Pedro Tommy Deshon
Gregory Patrick Andre Daniel
Christopher Daniel Juston Charles
Manuel Jeremy Ernest John Alan Patrick Robert Robert

Kenneth Christopher Stephen Timothy James Brian Julie Dallas
John Michael Rodricka
Jeffrey Justin Scott
Samuel Michael Jeremiah
Shawn Sonny William Joseph Robert
Collier Christopher Terry Trevor Krisna James
Dana Dustin Jeremy Linda Ann
Juan Torry Jesse
Demetrius Paul Brian Craig
David Dale Charles Danny Michael Todd Mark
Nicholas Tatjana
Torey Vincent Nicholas
DeForest Ken Shawn David Joseph

. . .

Joseph means God increases our abundance
Jeremiah means he who is exalted of the Lord
Jesse means we are wealthy in that God exists
Joshua means the Lord is our salvation
David means the beloved one
Daniel means God is my judge
Benjamin means the son of the right hand
Adam means man of the blood-red earth

. . .

Armando Anthony Dean Justin Juan
Harry Gregory Tommy Joseph
Elia Donald Moses Raymond
Yadir Larry Joshua
Roberto Bobby Craig David Jonathan Andrew Tavon
John John Daniel Michael Kane Nicholas Neil
Geoffrey Fernando Mark James Daniel Brandon David Brandon
Caleb Jacob Harvey Dustin Richard Henry Brad
Ryan Charles Kevin
Nachez Seth Jason Nicanor
Edward Christopher Matthew Robert Jacob Donald
Charles Alexander
Marco Nicholas Barton
Nickalous Omead Luis
Edgar Carl Aaron

Joseph Nicholas Ronald Alan Nicholas Eric Ryan
Shawna Charles Gary Elvis Brandon John Devin Lamont
Mick Joseph Quinn Derek David Michael Tomas
Yoe Timothy Chad Clarence
Lauro Jason James Michael
Edgar David Alexander
Jason Benjamin David Mathew Michael Dominic
Adrian Guy Carl Jaygee Cesar Jacob Kevin
Tyler Drew Gregory Foster Steven Andrew Christopher James
Thomas Brandon Steven Tony Robert Wesley Foster Joshua Nathan Lance
Skipper Adam Benjamin Ryan
Ramon Shane Aaron Robert Clifford David Eric
Joselito Kenneth Gregory Tyler Joshua Mike
Alan Allen Rodney Darren

Michael Jack Christopher James
Russell Richard Jeungjin
Jessica Morgen Michael Andrew Andrew
Carson James Michael Anthony Pamela Aaron Christopher Daniel
Ian Oscar Michael Dennis Victor Paul Jaime Charles
Mark Ronald Jeremy Mark
Bradley Omer David Josiah Kyle Brian William Alan
Brian Jonathan Michael William
Christopher Andrew William Douglas
Jesse Jonathan Dennis Richard Brian Jerome
Billy Michael Stephen Segun Maurice
John Michael Jeremy Christopher Travis
Andrew Kelley John Matthew

. . .

Aaron means lofty and exalted as the high mountain
Kyle means handsome and near to the chapel
Brian means strong as a castle keep
Andrew means manly
John means God has given gracious favor
Bradley means he who comes from the broad meadow
Alan means the handsome, cheerful one
Jeremy means he who has been appointed by God
Douglas means he who comes from the dark waters
Charles means a strong man
Oscar means filled with divine strength
Ronald means he who is mighty and powerful
Jaime means one who supplants another
Morgen means man of the sea
or it can mean the bright and shining morning
Victor means he who has conquered

. . .

James Charles Cody
Jared Jeremiah Carlos Justin Brian Sean Quoc
Otie Thomas David Branden Don Clinton
Clinton whose surname was Wisdom
and who served with the Kansas National Guard

Jeffrey Bryan Shane
Nathaniel Robert Joshua Steven Juan
Juan whose surname was Segura
and who served with the Marines

Nathan Nicholas William
Lonny Steven Abraham
David Travis John Todd Russell Horst Romulo
Dennis Justin Gene Aaron Erick Dan Michael
Julian Wesley Peter Thomas Sean
Theodore Theodore Kyle James Morgan Jarrod Brian
Nathan Raymond Jonathan Edward Brian David Nicholas James
Catalin Cole Jose
Sean Victor Benjamin Justin Kevin
Justin Byron George Nicholas Andres Dale
Lance William Shane James Marc Rafael Travis
Jeremy Antoine Patrick Isaiah
Bradley Marshall Luke Daniel
Jose Louis Christopher Michael
Luis Joseph Michael Demarkus
Bradley Phillip Dimitrios Jack
Joseph Joseph David
Michael Michael Blain Benjamin

Sergio Jacob Dale
Nicholas Gentian Ryan Jeffrey Michael Brian Harrison
David Bradley Jordan Harley
Travis Michael Jeremy Joshua
Kirk Charles Adam Stephen Trinidad
Carl Michael Blake Wilfredo
Christian Daryl Eric Jose Pablo

. . .

Daryl means the dearly beloved one
Eric means the ever-powerful and honorable king
Stephen means he who has been crowned
Travis means the man from the crossroads
Ryan means the little ruler
Christian means follower of the anointed one

. . .

Isaac Bryan
Javier Zachary David
George Henry Matthew Binh David Michael Joseph
Cari Anne David Salamo Kyle Andrew Edwin Marvin In Mark Todd
Arthur Patrick Andrew Christopher Kyle Gregory Robert
Joshua Joshua
Hilario Melvin Ian Jason Jeffrey Jeffrey
Richard Brent Tina
Tina was from American Samoa
she served in the Army Reserves
and her surname was Time

Victor Michael Franklin Berry
Berry was from Texas
he served in Army Transportation

and his surname was Meza
Donald Neil Joel
Lionel David Nicholas Cory Thomas
Jonathan Lynn Robert Darren Julian
Paul Robert William Raleigh
James Eric Christopher
Jose Todd Nathaniel Pablito
Jason Craig Oscar Damien
and Jason Smith, United States Marine Corps

. . .

Cari means the beloved little darling
Anne means she who is full of grace
Jessica means God sees
Shawna means she who is a gift from God
Linda means the pretty one
Julie means the young, soft-haired child of God
Melissa means she who is industrious as a honeybee
Leslie means she who comes from the small meadow
Isela means God is my satisfaction
Michelle means she who is like unto God
Tyanna means her home is filled with grace
Keicia means she who is brave
Katrina means she who is pure

. . .

Brian Jeff Pedro Jeremy Thomas Bennie Curtis
Joshua Jeremy Jimmy Cory Julio
Zachariah Warren
Armand Huey
Bradley Christopher Kurt Kenneth
Daniel Dwayne Joseph Robert William Michael Juan
Matthew Gunnar Brian Paul
Jayton Nathaniel Alain
Francis George Thomas Jesus
Christopher Joe Kyle Nainoa
Jose Leonard Brett Jesus Viktar Javier
Michael Joseph Jesse Michael
Nathan Gael Nathaniel
Tony Kyle Richard Timothy Travis Michael Brian
Joseph Matthew Dustin Darrell
Hector Rhonald Mourad
James Allan Dexter Sean Saeed
Brian Lyle Jonathan Paul
William Christopher Karl Jonathan
Taylor Fred Stephen Timothy John Kevin Jonathan
Lyle Joseph Christopher Michael Jonathan
Stephen Charles Orlando Mickey
Andrew Lindsey Edward Keith James
Nazario Mark Christopher Harry Jason

Robert Sean Sean Sean
Sean Brock of California
Sean Maher of Illinois
Sean Cooley of the Mississippi National Guard

Richard Stephen Daniel Steven
Travis Jeremy Zachary Jeffrey
Richard Jessica Richard William
Robert Kristopher Dakotah
Rene Chad David Ray
David Michael Adam Joseph Timothy
Christopher Katrina
Jason Justin Frank Carlos Kevin Seth Adam Clinton John
Jesse David Jason Trevor Eric Nicholas
Alexander Michael Jacob Daniel Chassan
Colby Jason Adam Landon Min
Andrew Richard Danny Julio
Lizbeth Wai Azhar Robert
Michael Juan Adriana Wade Stephen Donald Sean Seth Michael
Andrew Matthew Alec Donald Nicholas Joshua Ricky Paul
Rocky Shane Lee Jonathan
Francisco Paul Kevin Travis
Brian Norman Brett Michael Michael Isiah Lee
Samuel Kelly Kenneth
Eric Charles Robbie

. . .

Garry Ioasa Tenzin James
William Christopher Stephen
Jeremiah Javier
Glenn Pendelton Chrystal Daniel Charles
Edwin Clint David
Edward James David
Barbaralien Romanes Stephen Michael Sascha
Juan Kevin Casey John
Tyler Manuel Michael James
Aleina Aaron Randy Tromaine
Angelo Steven Joseph Steven

Sam who was eighteen years old when she died on the eighteenth of April

Kevin Jacob Kelly Marty Robert Gavin Anthony Aaron Kevin Robert Robert Gary Timmy Allen David Joseph Robert Ricky Eric William Timothy Charles Darren Ralph Stephen Clifford Kenya Juan

. . .

Derrick John KellyJohnTommyWilliamStephenAaron
LanceMichaelJefferyMichaelSteven
Nicolas Thor NicholasGaryRichardDustinLawrencemarcusanthonytaylorstephen
michaeljohnwesleyjourdanjonathannicholaschristophersamuelkendalljohnkenneth
andrewtravischarlesjacobwesleyantwanrobinbernardwyattkurtbradstevenkarljohn
charlestyleraaronkennethbenjaminkylechristopherjoshuarusselldanielsaburantaudrey
bryanjeffreydustincharlesrandypeteralfreddavidricardojoshua
matthew mark michael
albertphillipvictorjeffreycaseyderekjeremywilliammiguelstevenlouisphillipvirgil
antoniocharles

. . .

leroy of dale city
theodore of dallas
brian of chapmanville
eric of racine
justin of manzanola
carrie of caldwell
robert of sellersville
jonathan of eva
brian of simpson
eric of wyoming in michigan
terrence of new york city
douglas of sharon
emmanuel of yauco
louis of milford
phillip of suffern
roberto of laredo
michael of scituate
marc of pontotoc
michael of mankato
david of clinton
mark of unicoi
brad of middleburg heights
devon of st. louisville
thomas of strongsville
daniel of seattle
dustin of saint anthony
andrew of fowerville
mario of brownwood
victor of stockton
neil of baltimore
casey of schleswig
terrance of moss point
larry of carriere
stanley of las vegas
anthony of westerville
larry of austintown
john of stevens point
nathan of winchester
anthony of greenville
michael of morgantown
joshua of easton
chad of montrose
cesar of pomona
dion of los angeles
tyler of richardson
jesse of henderson
jonathan of san antonio
john of chicopee
erik of hermann
anthony of las vegas
christopher of marblehead
michael of knoxville
robert of austin
adam of charleston
william of lilburn
noah of ellijay
christopher of columbus
brian of pell city
christopher of danielson
james of chattanooga
nicholas of crown point
arnold of sacramento
duane of rancho california

. . .

regina
ramona
holly

christopher
joseph
chad
veashna
carlos
charles
keith
matthew
steven

eric
shamus
corey
kip
marcus
stephen
michael
chris
james
jacques
erik
jeffery
michael
jeffrey
daniel
james
manny
robert
rafael
chad
ryan
jeremy
michael
danny

the summer’s gone
and all the flowers are dying
danny, you must go
and i must bide
but come you back
when summer’s in the meadow
and i’ll be here, danny
in sunshine or in shadow

. . .

And Jacob was left alone; and there wrestled a man with him until the breaking of the day.  And when he saw that he prevailed not against him, he touched the hollow of his thigh; and the hollow of Jacob’s thigh was out of joint, as he wrestled with him.  And he said, Let me go, for the day breaketh.  And he said, I will not let thee go, except thou bless me.

. . .

Acknowledgments

The quotations at the opening of each lamentation and at the conclusion of the third lamentation are from the King James Version of the Bible (Judges 16:28, Job 16:12-16, Psalms 137:1, and Genesis 32:24-26).

The information about the soldiers, sailors, marines, and airmen who have given their lives was obtained from the ”Honor the Fallen” website, http://www.militarycity.com/valor/honor.html.

The meanings of names were derived from various of the over one million such websites available on the Internet.

“Danny Boy,” written by Frederick Weatherly, was the source of the variation on the final page of the third lamentation.

(Original materials copyright 2006, 2011 by Tetman Callis.)

1 Comment

1 response so far ↓

  • 1 Barbara williams // Aug 3, 2013 at 3:59 am

    Im trying to look you up in cardsapp and can’t find you. What’s your CBN?

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