The Art of Tetman Callis

Some of the stories and poems may be inappropriate for persons under 16

The Art of Tetman Callis header image 4

Entries Tagged as 'Barbara Tuchman'

Off the rack

August 20th, 2015 · No Comments

“The making of foreign policy in World War II came out of the great Allied conferences dominated by the military where the military staffs were the working members, and the civil arm, except for the two chiefs of state, was represented meagerly, if at all. Pomp and uniforms held the floor and everyone appeared twice […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Joseph Stillwell · The Second World War

Nice work if you can get it

August 19th, 2015 · No Comments

“It is a feature of governments that the more important the problem, the further it tends to be removed from handling by anyone well acquainted with the subject.” – Barbara Tuchman, Stillwell and the American Experience in China Share this…FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedinemailPrint

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Joseph Stillwell · Politics & Law · The Second World War

Not the way to bring about co-prosperity, my friend

August 18th, 2015 · No Comments

“On the borders of India the Japanese gamble had failed—although the fight went on—when Kohima was relieved and communications restored between Imphal and the Dimapur Road at the end of April [1944]. General Mutaguchi’s troops were left at the end of jungle trails without supply arrangements and with the monsoon pouring down. They fought on […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Joseph Stillwell · The Second World War

It can lead to triumph

August 17th, 2015 · No Comments

“In military as in other human affairs will is what makes things happen. There are circumstances that can modify or nullify it, but for offense or defense its presence is essential and its absence fatal.” – Barbara Tuchman, Stillwell and the American Experience in China Share this…FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedinemailPrint

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Joseph Stillwell · The Second World War

Hail, Britannia

August 16th, 2015 · No Comments

“No nation has ever produced a military history of such verbal nobility as the British. Retreat or advance, win or lose, blunder or bravery, murderous folly or unyielding resolution, all emerge alike clothed in dignity and touched with glory. Every engagement is gallant, every battle a decisive action. There is no shrinking from superlatives: every […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Joseph Stillwell · Lit & Crit · The Second World War

Calling all angels

August 6th, 2015 · No Comments

“Standing on a truck at daylight to address the company, Stillwell explained the plan of march and laid down his rules. All food was to be pooled and all personal belongings discarded except for what each person could carry in addition to weapon and ammunition. A journey of some 140 miles lay ahead with a […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Joseph Stillwell · The Second World War

And then they set out

August 5th, 2015 · No Comments

“The road gave out and all vehicles, except jeeps for carrying supplies, had to be abandoned, including the radio truck and the radio set itself which weighed 200 pounds. Last messages were sent. The sergeant bent to his work, tapping, listening anxiously and tapping again. The message to Brereton in India advised him of the […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Joseph Stillwell · The Second World War

And some more than that

August 4th, 2015 · No Comments

“Headquarters was moved 50 miles north of Mandalay to Shwebo, where the Japanese planes pursued. Among the staffs a sense was rising not only of military disaster but of personal danger. Some self-reportedly were in ‘a state of funk,’ others relapsed into passivity, not knowing what to do. The railroad was the worst problem. Stillwell […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Joseph Stillwell · The Second World War

Ballsy

August 2nd, 2015 · No Comments

“Government bureaus had departed for upper Burma, Indians of the police and clerical staffs were fleeing, Burmese employees melted into the population. Fires and looting, fifth-column groups and night-roaming marauders took over. All that remained of the civil administration were demolition squads awaiting the Governor-General’s last-minute order to blow up the docks. On the last […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Joseph Stillwell · The Second World War

The Great East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere

July 20th, 2015 · No Comments

“Determined to make an example of the capital that would bring the war to an end, the Japanese achieved a climax to the carnage already wrought in the delta below. Fifty thousand soldiers hacked, burned, bayoneted, raped and murdered until they had killed, by hand, according to the evidence witnessed and collected by missionaries and […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Economics · Joseph Stillwell · The Second World War

Defeat themselves is what they did

July 19th, 2015 · No Comments

“On September 24 [1937] the Japanese took Paoting, Sung Che-yuan’s headquarters on the Peking-Hankow Railway. The fever of savagery bred by their own campaigns burst out in a week’s rampage of murder, rape and pillage, by 30,000 soldiers. A self-defeating ferocity accompanied them like a hyena of conquest, growing more ravenous by what it fed […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Joseph Stillwell · The Second World War

Worn like a slicker in a storm

July 18th, 2015 · No Comments

“Familiar with the plight of the Chinese peasant and unfamiliar with Marxism, Stillwell regarded the Communists as a local phenomenon and a natural outcome of oppression. ‘Carrying their burdens of famine and drought, heavy rent and interest, squeezed by middlemen, absentee landlordism,’ he wrote of the farmers, ‘naturally they agitated for a readjustment of land […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Economics · Joseph Stillwell · Politics & Law · The Second World War

Lines in the sands of their times

July 17th, 2015 · No Comments

“The international horizon was darkening in 1936, with Fascism emboldened and the democracies infirm. In February extremist Japanese officers attempted a coup d’etat by multiple murder of elder statesmen which, though it failed, had a subduing effect on opponents of militarism. In March Hitler occupied the Rhineland unopposed. In May Mussolini annexed Ethiopia; the League’s […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Joseph Stillwell · The Second World War

Do something? Anything? Even if it’s the wrong thing?

July 16th, 2015 · No Comments

“[Stillwell] had been struck by the Taoist motto on the virtues on inaction which he had copied down from an example in the Great Audience Hall of the Forbidden City. Only the first two characters for Wu Wei, or ‘Do nothing,’ were given there, leaving the Chinese viewer to add mentally, ‘and all things will […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Economics · Joseph Stillwell · Politics & Law · The Second World War

It seemed like a good idea at the time

July 15th, 2015 · No Comments

“After the seizure of Mukden the Japanese Army, regardless of divided councils at home, pushed ahead to attack Chinchow, Chang Hsueh-liang’s provincial capital just north of the Great Wall. They captured the city in January 1932, driving the Young Marshal out of Manchuria. The ‘independence’ of the new state of ‘Manchukuo’ was proclaimed in February […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Joseph Stillwell · The Second World War

Bop ‘im on ‘is nose, slap ‘er on ‘er cheek

July 14th, 2015 · No Comments

“Successful aggression is rarely self-terminated.” – Barbara Tuchman, Stillwell and the American Experience in China Share this…FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedinemailPrint

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Joseph Stillwell · The Second World War

Xenophobia reaps its harvest

July 13th, 2015 · No Comments

“Stillwell decided to give the crowd no time to test its intentions. As the train pulled into P’u Kow, on the Yangtze opposite Nanking, he and Chao jumped off before it came to a stop, and pushing past astonished people, ran for the river feeling pursuit at their heels but not daring to look behind […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Joseph Stillwell · The Second World War

Madame est servie

July 8th, 2015 · No Comments

“One evening [Stillwell] dined at the mess of Colonel Cantau, a bald, fat officer of sixty who wore enlisted man’s cap, rows of decorations, hazed the servants, ate well and ‘doesn’t give a damn.’ It being a meatless Friday, the meal consisted of two kinds of omelet, fish and rice, vegetable salad, white and red […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Joseph Stillwell · The Great War · The Second World War

He can shoot you some style

July 7th, 2015 · No Comments

“The Frenchman is the ideal soldier. Not only can he fight, but he can tell you about it.” – Heywood Broun (as quoted by Barbara Tuchman in Stillwell and the American Experience in China) Share this…FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedinemailPrint

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Joseph Stillwell · Lit & Crit · The Great War · The Second World War

Thar goes yer militia

July 4th, 2015 · No Comments

“The first essential in war is an army that will not run away, which can only be assured by training. Without training, a soldier is not worth what it takes to put him in position, an officer is useless, an army is a rabble.” – Barbara Tuchman, Stillwell and the American Experience in China Share […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Joseph Stillwell

The age of innocence

July 3rd, 2015 · No Comments

“In April 1917 the United States, with an army of 133,000 men, entered the war in which the belligerents had more that six million men engaged on the Western Front alone. The European national forces were organized into armies each containing three to five corps, each corps usually consisting of two divisions. The American army […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Joseph Stillwell · The Great War

Tho’ it mayhap be one hope forlorn

June 30th, 2015 · No Comments

“The core of the military profession is discipline and the essence of discipline is obedience. Since this does not come naturally to men of independent and rational mind, they must train themselves in the habit of obedience in which lives and the fortunes of battle may some day depend. Reasonable orders are easy enough to […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Joseph Stillwell · The Second World War

Blame-shifting is inherent

June 29th, 2015 · No Comments

“All living generations are responsible for what we do and all dead ones as well.” – Joseph Stillwell (as quoted by Barbara Tuchman in Stillwell and the American Experience in China) Share this…FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedinemailPrint

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Economics · Joseph Stillwell · Politics & Law · The Second World War

Come falling down

November 22nd, 2014 · No Comments

“The proud tower built up through the great age of European civilization was an edifice of grandeur and passion, of riches and beauty and dark cellars. Its inhabitants lived, as compared to a later time, with more self-reliance, more confidence, more hope; greater magnificence, extravagance and elegance; more careless ease, more gaiety, more pleasure in […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Lit & Crit · The Great War

Busybody do-gooders

November 21st, 2014 · No Comments

“Like a crack in a plank of wood which cannot be sealed, the difference between the worker and the intellectual was ineradicable in Socialism. Organized Socialism bore the name Workingmen’s Association but in fact it was never any such thing. It was a movement not of, but on behalf of, the working class, and the […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Lit & Crit · Politics & Law · The Great War

Join the union while you may, don’t wait till your dying day, for that may not be far away

November 18th, 2014 · No Comments

“For unskilled and unorganized labour, working conditions matched the slums. At the Shawfield Chemical Works in Glasgow in 1897, year of the Diamond Jubilee, workmen received 3d. or 4d. an hour for a twelve-hour day, seven days a week, spent amid poisonous vapors without a lunch-hour rest. They ate lunch standing at the furnaces and […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Economics · Lit & Crit · The Great War

All the children left behind

November 17th, 2014 · No Comments

“In the slums people lived three to a bedroom of 700 cubic feet or, with children, eight and nine in a space of 1,200 cubic feet. Vermin lived with them, a piece of paper on the floor served as a toilet, fish on Sundays was the weekly protein for a family of eight, at two […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Economics · Lit & Crit · Politics & Law · The Great War

We got it from the French

November 14th, 2014 · No Comments

“To be governed is to be watched, inspected, spied on, regulated, indoctrinated, preached at, controlled, ruled, censored, by persons who have neither wisdom nor virtue. It is every action and transaction to be registered, stamped, taxed, patented, licensed, assessed, measured, reprimanded, corrected, frustrated. Under pretext of the public good it is to be exploited, monopolized, […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Lit & Crit · Politics & Law · The Great War

The dream lingers long after dawn

November 13th, 2014 · No Comments

“The Anarchists believed that with Property, the monarch of all evil, eliminated, no man could again live off the labour of another and human nature would be released to seek its natural level of justice among men. The role of the State would be replaced by voluntary cooperation among individuals and the role of the […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Economics · Lit & Crit · Politics & Law · The Great War

Conditions that are reckoned incentives

November 12th, 2014 · No Comments

“They came from the warrens of the poor, where hunger and dirt were king, where consumptives coughed and the air was thick with the smell of latrines, boiling cabbage and stale beer, where babies wailed and couples screamed in sudden quarrels, where roofs leaked and unmended windows let in the cold blasts of winter, where […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Barbara Tuchman · Economics · Lit & Crit · Politics & Law · The Great War