The Art of Tetman Callis

Some of the stories and poems may be inappropriate for persons under 16

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Entries Tagged as 'Hugh Gibson'

Not how to win a modern war

December 30th, 2014 · No Comments

“After a hasty lunch we made off to Dinant, still following the Meuse. The thin line of houses down the course of the river were thinner than they were a few months ago, and there were signs of suffering and distress everywhere. I had never been to Dinant before, but had seen pictures of it […]

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Tags: Hugh Gibson · Lit & Crit · The Great War

When the Germans came to town

December 29th, 2014 · No Comments

“The Burgomaster came into the restaurant to find us, and offered to go on with us to Visé, to show us the town, and we were glad to have him, as he knows the place like the palm of his hand. I had been through Visé twice, and had marvelled at the completeness of the […]

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Tags: Hugh Gibson · Lit & Crit · The Great War

Pragmatism in action

December 28th, 2014 · No Comments

“Marshal Langhorne came in to-day from The Hague to effect formal delivery of the first bargeload of food, and had weird tales to tell of his adventures by the way. Thank goodness, the first of the food has arrived in time, and if the flow can be kept up, the worst of our troubles will […]

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Tags: Hugh Gibson · Lit & Crit · The Great War

King and Queen of the immense nation of Sorrow

December 27th, 2014 · No Comments

“As soon as we had got through, I had to start back for my audience of the Queen. W.—– took me out to la Panne, where we found the Villa on the sand dunes, a little way back of the lines. There were a couple of gendarmes on duty, the King’s Secretary, and the Countess […]

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Tags: Hugh Gibson · Lit & Crit · The Great War

Don’t think they wouldn’t do it

December 26th, 2014 · No Comments

“In the course of a visit to General von Lüttwitz to-day, one of the colleagues remarked that the Germans must keep the Belgians alive, and could not allow them to starve. Lüttwitz was not at all of that mind, for he said with some show of feeling: ‘The allies are at liberty to feed the […]

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Tags: Hugh Gibson · Lit & Crit · The Great War

Lads thirsty for blood of all types

December 24th, 2014 · No Comments

“The way the German army cleaned out the wine of the country was a revelation to everybody. They would not take what they needed for the day’s drinking but would clear out whole cellars at a time and load what was not drunk onto carts to be carried away. The result was that people who […]

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Tags: Hugh Gibson · Lit & Crit · The Great War

And we thought they fought only for beer and slaughter

December 23rd, 2014 · No Comments

“Count and Countess de X—– had an interesting story to tell of their experiences when the first armies went through. When the war broke out they were at their château and were caught by the first onrush of troops. Their fine cellars were emptied for the benefit of the invader, but nothing more serious happened […]

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Tags: Hugh Gibson · Lit & Crit · The Great War

And dead they remain to this day

December 22nd, 2014 · No Comments

“When I got back to the Legation, I found a nice Belgian who had no request to make of us, but wanted to tell his story to somebody, and a terrible story it was, too. He had fitted up his château near Mons as a Red Cross hospital. During the battle there a week ago, […]

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Tags: Hugh Gibson · Lit & Crit · The Great War

Modern war comes to old town

December 18th, 2014 · No Comments

“The boulevards were deserted save for the troops coming back into the town [Louvain]. New houses were burning that had been intact in the afternoon. After passing the Porte de Tirlemont, we began to see people again—little groups that had come out into the streets through a craving for company, and stood huddled together listening […]

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Tags: Hugh Gibson · Lit & Crit · The Great War

The end of the old world

December 17th, 2014 · No Comments

“I stopped at the Palace to sign the King’s book, and ran into General Jungbluth, who was just starting off with the Queen. She came down the stairs and stopped just long enough to greet me, and then went her way; she is a brave little woman and deserves a better fate than she has […]

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Tags: Hugh Gibson · Lit & Crit · The Great War