The Art of Tetman Callis

Some of the stories and poems may be inappropriate for persons under 16

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Entries Tagged as 'Rick Atkinson'

Haunted

May 9th, 2016 · No Comments

“To a soldier named Frank Maddalena, who went missing in the [Hürtgen] forest in mid-November [1944], his wife, Natalie, mother of his two children, wrote from New York: ‘I see you everywhere—in the chair, behind me, in the shadows of the room.’ In another note she added, ‘Still no mail from you. I really don’t […]

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Tags: Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

Birds of a feather

May 8th, 2016 · No Comments

“German soldiers streamed toward the German frontier through Picardy and Belgium, Lorraine and the Ardennes, bellowing, ‘The Americans will be here in twenty minutes!’. . . . In what the OB West war diary called an ‘ignominious rout,’ Germans unable to find white flags surrendered by waving chickens.” – Rick Atkinson, The Guns at Last […]

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Tags: Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

Would you like another cup of tea, dear?

May 8th, 2016 · No Comments

“A dignified American woman with close-cropped gray hair, whose living room in Culoz was dominated by a large portrait of her painted by Picasso, sent a note to Seventh Army headquarters along with a fruitcake baked by her companion, Alice B. Toklas. ‘We have waited for you all so long and here you are,’ wrote […]

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Tags: Lit & Crit · Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

Paris was not burning

May 8th, 2016 · No Comments

“Warm summer rain drenched the motley legions of liberation at dawn on Thursday, August 24 [1944], as three columns from the French 2nd Armored Division made ready for battle twenty miles southwest of Paris. Village women scurried through the bivouacs carrying urns of coffee and platters heaped with fried eggs and breakfast rolls. Soldiers finished […]

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Tags: Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

The misunderstood military multitude

May 7th, 2016 · No Comments

“On they marched, south, east, and west: past stone barns and mules hauling milk in copper urns, past shops that still peddled perfume and silk scarves, past collaborators with crude swastikas swabbed onto their shaved heads. When the trucks halted for a moment and GIs tumbled out to urinate in squirming echelons on the road […]

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Tags: Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

Death in the forenoon

May 7th, 2016 · No Comments

“In the Guards Chapel at Wellington Barracks on Birdcage Walk, across from the former pig meadow and leper colony currently known as St. James’s Park, a full-throated congregation belted out the ‘Te Deum’ and prepared to take communion from the bishop of Maidstone. ‘To Thee all angels cry aloud,’ they sang, ‘the heavens and all […]

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Tags: Ernest Hemingway · Rick Atkinson · The Second World War · Winston Churchill

Also sprach der Teufel

May 7th, 2016 · No Comments

“Terror is broken by terror. Everything else is nonsense.” – Adolph Hitler (quoted by  Rick Atkinson in The Guns at Last Light) Share this…FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedinemailPrint

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Politics & Law · Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

A lion in winter

May 7th, 2016 · No Comments

“The Führer and his entourage flew from Berchtesgaden in four Focke-Wulf Condors to Metz, then drove 175 miles in armored cars to Margival. . . . This was Hitler’s first return to France since 1940, and he looked like a man who was losing a world war: eyes bloodshot and puffy from insomnia, skin sallow, […]

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Tags: Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

How, indeed

May 7th, 2016 · No Comments

“How can one be expected to govern a country that has two hundred and forty-six different kinds of cheese?” – Charles De Gaulle (quoted by  Rick Atkinson in The Guns at Last Light) Share this…FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedinemailPrint

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Tags: Politics & Law · Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

The winning percentage

May 7th, 2016 · No Comments

“As long as fifty-one percent of your decisions are right, you’ll succeed.” – Field Marshal Bernard Law Montgomery (quoted by  Rick Atkinson in The Guns at Last Light) Share this…FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedinemailPrint

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Tags: Economics · Rick Atkinson · The Second World War · Verandah

Most of us get luckier

May 6th, 2016 · No Comments

“The way to fame is a hard one. You must suffer and be the butt of jealousy and ill-informed criticism. It is a lonely matter.” – Field Marshal Bernard Law Montgomery (quoted by  Rick Atkinson in The Guns at Last Light) Share this…FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedinemailPrint

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Tags: Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

Darling little bastards

May 5th, 2016 · No Comments

“Despite War Department assurances that ‘men who refrain from sexual acts are frequently stronger, owing to their conservation of energy,’ so many GIs impregnated British women that the U.S. government agreed to give local courts jurisdiction in ‘bastardy proceedings’; child support was fixed at £1 per week until the little Anglo-American turned thirteen, and 5 […]

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Tags: Economics · Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

The dirty dozens

May 4th, 2016 · No Comments

“In April 1944, the War Department decreed that inductees need have only a ‘reasonable chance’ of adjusting to military life, although psychiatric examiners were advised to watch for two dozen ‘personality deviations,’ including silly laughter, sulkiness, resentfulness of discipline, and other traits that would seemingly disqualify every teenager in the United States. In addition, the […]

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Tags: Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

The average Joe

May 3rd, 2016 · No Comments

“The typical soldier stood five feet eight inches tall and weighed 144 pounds, but physical standards had been lowered to accept defects that once would have kept many young men out of uniform. A man with 20/400 vision could now be conscripted if his sight was correctable to at least 20/40 in one eye; toward […]

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Tags: Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

G.I. Joe

May 2nd, 2016 · No Comments

“The average GI was twenty-six, born the year that the war to end all wars had ended, but manpower demands in this global struggle meant the force was growing younger: henceforth nearly half of all American troops arriving to fight in Europe in 1944 would be teenagers. One in three GIs had only a grade […]

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Tags: Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

Over there, again

May 1st, 2016 · No Comments

“Down the gangplanks they tromped, names checked from a clipboard, each soldier wearing his helmet, his field jacket, and a large celluloid button color-coded by the section of the ship to which he had been confined during the passage. Troops carried four blankets apiece to save cargo space, while deluded officers could be seen lugging […]

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Tags: Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

Couldn’t say

April 30th, 2016 · No Comments

“It is quite pleasant to be famous. Probably bad for the soul.” – General George S. Patton, Jr. (quoted by  Rick Atkinson in The Guns at Last Light) Share this…FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedinemailPrint

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Tags: Lit & Crit · Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

Liberation celebration

April 20th, 2016 · No Comments

“[Colonel] Howze at twilight led a tank company toward the central rail station to find boulevards empty and windows shuttered. Then a sash flew open, a voice shrieked ‘Americano!,’ and Romans by the thousands swept into the streets despite the occasional ping from a sniper round. Delirious citizens flung themselves on to Howze’s jeep and […]

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Tags: Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

New positions opening all the time

April 19th, 2016 · No Comments

“All troops were at risk, but none more than infantrymen, who accounted for 14 percent of the Army’s overseas strength and sustained 70 percent of the casualties. A study of four infantry divisions in Italy found that a soldier typically no longer wondered ‘whether he will be hit, but when and how bad.’ The army […]

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Tags: Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

The hand of fate is on me now

April 18th, 2016 · No Comments

“Everything is in the hands of the fates, and many of the boys have met theirs already. I badly want to get home to my wife and son. I want to be able to enjoy something of the beauty of life again. Here we have nothing but terror and horror, death and damnation.” Unidentified German […]

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Tags: Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

All watched over by virgins of loving grace

April 17th, 2016 · No Comments

“The Guards’ command post occupied the crypt beneath a Catholic church, entered only on hands and knees through a hole scratched in the rubble. A decomposing German soldier lay near the entrance and those passing in and out would subsequently bow to him for luck, whispering, ‘Good evening, Hans.’ Shell fire and bombs had sliced […]

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Tags: Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

Matters worth fighting over

April 16th, 2016 · No Comments

“Berlin had always considered Mussolini to be weak-kneed on the Jewish question, and on September 24, 1943, with the Duce reduced to a pathetic puppet, the Reichsführer-SS, Heinrich Himmler, secretly ordered the Gestapo chief in Rome, Lieutenant Colonel Herbert Kappler, to arrest all Jews in the city. The thirty-five-year-old Kappler, gray-eyed son of a Stuttgart […]

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Tags: Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

Not a glamour shot

April 15th, 2016 · No Comments

“Daily life in combat units resolved itself into noise, filth, isolation, confusion, fatigue, and mortality; everything else seemed extraneous. Soldiers distrusted the gung ho, the cocksure, and anyone less miserable than themselves. ‘We learned to live as perhaps once we were long ago, as simply as animals without hope for ourselves or pity for another,’ […]

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Tags: Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

Adults only

April 14th, 2016 · No Comments

“At 3:30 p.m. on February 7 [1944], a Luftwaffe bomber chased by a Spitfire jettisoned five antipersonnel bombs over the 95th Evacuation Hospital, where four hundred patients lay in ward tents. Newly wounded soldiers had just arrived by ambulance, and operating rooms were jammed when flame and steel swept the compound. . . .  Twenty-eight […]

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Tags: Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

Where the fault lies

April 13th, 2016 · No Comments

“Ninety percent of the trouble with Negro troops was the fault of the whites.” – Lieutenant General Ira C. Eaker, Commander-in-Chief, Mediterranean Allied Air Forces, 1944 (quoted by Rick Atkinson in The Day of Battle) Share this…FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedinemailPrint

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Tags: Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

But it still takes so long

April 12th, 2016 · No Comments

“Before the war, only nine black Americans possessed commercial pilot certificates, and fewer than three hundred had private licenses. Training began at Tuskegee Army Air Field in July 1941; the first pilots received their wings the following spring, then waited a year before deploying to North Africa as the only black AAF unit in a […]

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Tags: Economics · Politics & Law · Rick Atkinson

Going to the mountaintop

April 11th, 2016 · No Comments

“Under pressure from black civic leaders and a crying need for fighters, three black Army divisions had been created: the 2nd Cavalry, which arrived in North Africa only to be disbanded to provide service troops; the 93rd Infantry, shipped to the Pacific; and the 92nd Infantry, which would arrive in Italy in late summer 1944 […]

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Tags: Economics · Politics & Law · Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

Studies reveal . . .

April 10th, 2016 · No Comments

“Among the prevalent stereotypes was a belief that blacks were too dumb, too lazy, or too apathetic to serve as combat troops. An Army study decried their ‘lack of education and mechanical skill,’ as well as ‘a venereal rate eight to ten times that of white troops, a tendency to abuse equipment, lack of interest […]

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Tags: Economics · Politics & Law · Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

Fear of flying

April 9th, 2016 · No Comments

“The 1940 Draft Act banned racial discrimination, but only 250 blacks sat on the nation’s 6,400 draft boards; most southern states forbade any African-American board members. White America’s treatment of the hundreds of thousands of black volunteers and draftees ranged from unfortunate to despicable. The Mississippi congressional delegation asked the War Department to keep all […]

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Tags: Politics & Law · Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

High flight

April 8th, 2016 · No Comments

“The brightest news awaiting [General] Clark at Anzio was not on the beachhead but a mile above it. On January 27 and 28 [1944], an obscure fighter unit, known formally as the 99th Fighter Squadron (Separate), made its first significant mark in combat with guns blazing, shooting down twelve German aircraft. . . . [T]he […]

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Tags: Politics & Law · Rick Atkinson · The Second World War