The Art of Tetman Callis

Some of the stories and poems may be inappropriate for persons under 16

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Entries Tagged as 'Adolf Hitler'

Alles ist kaput!

August 8th, 2016 · No Comments

“I entered the town with my CP group, Already at least fifty German soldiers were assembled before the second house, their hands raised high above their heads and dazed, startled expressions of incredulity on their faces. Others poured from every building as eager GIs sought them out with curses and shouts of derision. Some hurried […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Charles B. MacDonald · Politics & Law · The Second World War

Breakfast is served

May 22nd, 2016 · No Comments

“Hitler ate a late lunch with his two secretaries and his dietician. Dressed in a uniform jacket and black trousers, he then shook hands with his staff, murmuring a few words of farewell before retreating to his study. Eva Braun, wearing a blue dress trimmed in white, joined him at 3:30 p.m. [April 30, 1945.] […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

Also sprach der Teufel

May 7th, 2016 · No Comments

“Terror is broken by terror. Everything else is nonsense.” – Adolph Hitler (quoted by  Rick Atkinson in The Guns at Last Light) Share this… Facebook Pinterest Twitter Linkedin Email Print

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Politics & Law · Rick Atkinson · The Second World War

Yield to merging traffic

February 7th, 2016 · No Comments

“The automobile is the world’s most effective killing machine, with victims outnumbering any war, with millions maimed, shocked, crazed by the car, half the world trashed by its production, made brutal, ugly, used up, useless, with endless highways and hospitals to maintain, most citizens in debt to their eyes for this toy . . . […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Economics · Lit & Crit · William H. Gass

Not a mensch

February 5th, 2016 · No Comments

“Sure, Adolf Hitler knew how to play the piano (badly), how to type (slowly), how to drive a car (erratically), how to draw (inadequately), how to write (drivel), how to remember (photographically), and how to bombast (beautifully). But bombast isn’t bombing. He was in fact a petty little twerp. A man of such meager means […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Lit & Crit · The Second World War · William H. Gass

Business as usual

December 3rd, 2015 · No Comments

“In February 1933, soon after being named Chancellor, Adolph Hitler convened a meeting with German business leaders. The three business leaders most vital to the war industry and rearmament of the Wehrmacht were present: Baron Gustav Krupp von Bohlen, who made armaments; Karl Bosch and Georg von Schnitzler from I.G. Farben, the chemical maker; and […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Economics · Politics & Law · The Second World War

Prisoners of the state

November 15th, 2015 · No Comments

“The radio announced that Hitler had come out of his safe bomb-proof bunker to talk with the fourteen to sixteen year old boys who had ‘volunteered’ for the ‘honor’ to be accepted into the SS and to die for their Führer in the defense of Berlin. What a cruel lie! These boys did not volunteer, […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Politics & Law · The Second World War

Springtime in Berlin

September 27th, 2015 · No Comments

“Through the springtime foliage of the Tiergarten the shells burst without interruption, destroying everything in their immediate vicinity, and small-arms fire erupted everywhere. Blinding sunshine lay over a gruesome scene. On the lawns of the Tiergarten under age-old but now mutilated trees, I could recognize artillery pieces, all put out of action by direct hits. […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · The Second World War

Apocalypse then

September 26th, 2015 · No Comments

“By the end of April [1945], we no longer had any chance of defending Berlin. The horrible, hopeless battles in the streets continued. . . . Russian tanks were now driving around the city, German tank-hunter groups were chasing them . . . and both sides were shooting wildly in all directions.” – Siegfried Knappe, […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · The Second World War

l’état, il était lui

September 25th, 2015 · No Comments

“I saluted, and Hitler walked toward me. As he neared, I was shocked by his appearance. He was stooped, and his left arm was bent and shaking. Half of his face drooped, as if he’d had a stroke, and his facial muscles on that side no longer worked. Both of his hands shook, and one […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · The Second World War

Nowhere to run, nowhere to hide

September 24th, 2015 · No Comments

“Russian artillery shells were exploding everywhere, causing the earth to tremble and sending dirt, pavement, bricks, and other debris high into the air, where they became weapons dangerous to anyone under them when they fell. The roar of flames from burning buildings and the crunching sound of collapsing walls were terrifying. We dashed from doorway […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · The Second World War

No sleeping in Hell

September 23rd, 2015 · No Comments

“The city’s defenders were red-eyed and sleepless, living in a world of little more than fire, smoke, death, and horror. Much of Berlin was burning like a bonfire.” – Siegfried Knappe, “The End in the Bunker” Share this… Facebook Pinterest Twitter Linkedin Email Print

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · The Second World War

Asleep at the wheel’s falling off

September 22nd, 2015 · No Comments

“There was no such thing as a typical day. Sometimes the Russians would hit us at three in the morning, sometimes at six, and the day just unfolded from there. Our time was spent responding to crises that incessantly occurred. . . . We all caught a few moments’ rest whenever work permitted. Several times […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · The Second World War

Experienced only need apply

September 21st, 2015 · No Comments

“The sector commander I was visiting had his headquarters in the basement of a brewery. The entire sector staff consisted of amputees, but that at least meant they had combat experience.” – Siegfried Knappe, “The End in the Bunker” Share this… Facebook Pinterest Twitter Linkedin Email Print

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · The Second World War

A man for his times

June 1st, 2015 · No Comments

“Hitler’s name justifiably stands for all time as that of the chief instigator of the most profound collapse of civilization in modern times. The extreme form of personal rule which an ill-educated beerhall demagogue and racist bigot, a narcissistic, megalomaniac, self-styled national saviour was allowed to acquire and exercise in a modern, economically advanced, and […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Ian Kershaw · Lit & Crit · The Second World War

Mistakes were made

May 31st, 2015 · No Comments

“Few of those forced to account for their actions under Hitler showed remorse or contrition, let alone guilt. With scant exception, they showed themselves, when called to book, incapable of acknowledging their own contribution to the remorseless slide into barbarism during the Nazi era. Alongside the inevitable lies, distortions, and excuses often went, it seems, […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Ian Kershaw · Lit & Crit · The Second World War

Trails of tears

May 29th, 2015 · No Comments

“There were still over 65,000 prisoners of numerous nationalities—the majority of them Jewish—in Auschwitz and its numerous subsidiary camps in mid-January 1945, as the Red Army approached. . . . arrangements to evacuate the camps were improvised with great haste. . . . For five days, beginning on 17 January, long columns of emaciated, starving, […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Ian Kershaw · Lit & Crit · The Second World War

Tied to the tracks

May 27th, 2015 · No Comments

“There was no way out. The failure of the conspiracy to remove Hitler took away the last opportunity of a negotiated end to the war. For the German people, it ensured the near total destruction of their country. Whatever the varied reactions to the events of 20 July [1944] and their aftermath, ordinary Germans were […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Ian Kershaw · Lit & Crit · The Second World War

Trapped rats

May 18th, 2015 · No Comments

“For all the continuing (and in some ways astonishing) reserves of strength of the Führer cult among outright Nazi supporters, Hitler had become for the overwhelming majority of Germans the chief hindrance to the ending of the war. Ordinary people might prefer, as they were reported to be saying, ‘an end with horror’ to ‘a […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Ian Kershaw · Lit & Crit · The Second World War

Sick and tired and bound over for perdition

May 17th, 2015 · No Comments

“By 1944, Hitler was a sick man—at times during the year extremely unwell. Cardiograms, the first taken in 1941, had revealed a worsening heart condition. And beyond the chronic stomach and intestinal problems that had increasingly come to plague him, Hitler had since 1942 developed symptoms, becoming more pronounced in 1944, which point with some […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Ian Kershaw · Lit & Crit · The Second World War

Checks and checkmates

May 16th, 2015 · No Comments

“In a modern state, necessarily resting on bureaucracy and dependent upon system and regulated procedure, centring all spheres of power in the hands of one man—whose leadership style was utterly unbureaucratic and whose approach to rule was completely unsystematic, resting as it did on a combination of force and propaganda—could only produce administrative chaos amid […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Ian Kershaw · Lit & Crit · The Second World War

Not anything that could happen here

May 15th, 2015 · No Comments

“The German people’s bonds with Hitler were dissolving. This was no overnight phenomenon. But Stalingrad was the point at which the signs became unmistakable. . . . The mood was sullenly depressed, anxious about the present, fearful of the future, above all else weary of the war; but not rebellious. . . . [T[houghts of […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Ian Kershaw · Lit & Crit · The Second World War

A half-million here, a half-million there — it begins to add up

May 14th, 2015 · No Comments

“If Hitler felt any personal remorse for Stalingrad or human sympathy for the dead of the 6th Army and their relatives, he did not let it show. Those in his closest proximity could detect the signs of nervous strain. He hinted privately at his worry that his health would not stand up to the pressure. […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Ian Kershaw · Lit & Crit · The Second World War

A rose by any other name

May 13th, 2015 · No Comments

“In Munich, a group of students, together with one of their professors, whose idealism and mounting detestation of the criminal inhumanity of the regime had led them the previous year to form the ‘White Rose’ opposition-group, now openly displayed their attack on Hitler. The medical students Alexander Schmorell and Hans Scholl had formed the initial […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Ian Kershaw · Lit & Crit · The Second World War

Having themselves a very little Christmas

May 12th, 2015 · No Comments

“For the German people, quite especially for the many German families with loved ones in the 6th Army, Christmas 1942 was a depressing festival. A radio broadcast linking troops on all the fighting fronts, including Stalingrad, brought tears to the eyes of many a family gathered around the Christmas tree back home, as the men […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Ian Kershaw · Lit & Crit · The Second World War

Stundenlang

May 11th, 2015 · No Comments

“For those in the Führer Headquarters not preoccupied with military planning, life was dull and monotonous. Hitler’s secretaries would go for a daily walk to the next village and back. Otherwise, they whiled away the hours. Chatting, a film in the evenings, and the obligatory gathering each afternoon in the Tea House and late at […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Ian Kershaw · Lit & Crit · The Second World War

Cashed in, cashed out

May 5th, 2015 · No Comments

“Elser himself was already under arrest at the customs post near Konstanz when the bomb went off. He had been picked up trying to cross the Swiss border illegally. It seemed a routine arrest. Only some hours after the explosion did the border officials begin to realize that the contents of Georg Elser’s pockets, including […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Ian Kershaw · Lit & Crit · The Second World War

Authorizing slaughter

May 4th, 2015 · No Comments

“It was some time in October [1939] that Hitler had one of his secretaries type, on his own headed notepaper and backdated to 1 September 1939—the day that the war had begun—the single sentence: ‘Reichsleiter Bouhler and Dr med. Brandt are commissioned with the responsibility of extending the authority of specified doctors so that, after […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Ian Kershaw · Lit & Crit · The Second World War

The professional evaluation

May 3rd, 2015 · No Comments

“With the decision to invade the Soviet Union, confirmed in the directive of 18 December 1940, Hitler had closed off his strategic options. In his anxiety not to concede the initiative in the war, he had shifted the entire focus of the German war effort to the aim of inflicting comprehensive military defeat on the […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Ian Kershaw · Lit & Crit · The Second World War

Not like nowadays

May 2nd, 2015 · No Comments

“Hitler’s combination of bullying and blackmail could not have worked but for the fragility of the post-war European settlement. The Treaty of Versailles was ‘the blackmailer’s lucky find’. It had given Hitler the basis for his rising demands, accelerating drastically in 1938-9. It had provided the platform for ethnic unrest, that Hitler could easily exploit, […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Ian Kershaw · Lit & Crit · The Second World War