The Art of Tetman Callis

Some of the stories and poems may be inappropriate for persons under 16

The Art of Tetman Callis header image 4

Entries from July 2021

July 24th, 2021 · No Comments

“In Great-Britain it is said their constitution relies on the house of commons for honesty, and the lords for wisdom; which would be a rational reliance if honesty were to be bought with money, and if wisdom were hereditary.” – Thomas Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia Share this…FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedinemailPrint

[Read more →]

Tags: Politics & Law · The American Constitution · Thomas Jefferson

July 23rd, 2021 · No Comments

“Take care that you never spell a word wrong. Always before you write a word consider how it is spelt, and if you do not remember it, turn to a dictionary. It produces great praise to a lady to spell well.” – Thomas Jefferson, “Letter to Martha Jefferson”, November 28, 1783 Share this…FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedinemailPrint

[Read more →]

Tags: Lit & Crit · The American Constitution · Thomas Jefferson

July 22nd, 2021 · No Comments

“How far men, who labour under the pressure of accumulated distress, and are irritated by a belief that they are treated with neglect, ingratitude, and injustice in the extreme, might be worked upon by designing men, is worthy of very serious consideration.” – George Washington, “Letter to Lund Washington”, March 19, 1783 Share this…FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedinemailPrint

[Read more →]

Tags: George Washington · Politics & Law · The American Constitution

July 21st, 2021 · No Comments

“Be courteous to all, but intimate with few, and let those few be well tried before you give them your confidence; true friendship is a plant of slow growth, and must undergo and withstand the shocks of adversity before it is entitled to the appellation. Let your heart feel for the affliction, and distresses of […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Economics · George Washington · Politics & Law · The American Constitution

July 20th, 2021 · No Comments

“I want my poems to have edges. To be more like a photograph than a movie. 35mm, a rule of dimensions: what is and is not in the shot. If you want to include more in the image than will fit, you have to change where you stand. Either that or change the world: Move […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Lit & Crit

July 19th, 2021 · No Comments

“A Suedish Minister having assembled the Chiefs of the Sasquehanah Indians, made a Sermon to them, acquainting them with the principal historical Facts on which our Religion is founded, such as the Fall of our first Parents by Eating an Apple, the Coming of Christ to repair the Mischief, his Miracles and Suffering, &c. When […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Benjamin Franklin · Politics & Law · The American Constitution

July 18th, 2021 · No Comments

“Savages we call them, because their manners differ from ours, which we think the Perfection of Civility; they think the same of theirs. Perhaps if we could examine the manners of different Nations with Impartiality, we should find no People so rude as to be without any Rules of Politeness; nor any so polite as […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Benjamin Franklin · Politics & Law · The American Constitution

July 17th, 2021 · No Comments

“Wherever a discretionary power is lodged in any set of men over the property of their neighbours, they will abuse it. Their passions, prejudices, dislikes, will have the principal lead in measuring the abilities of those over whom their power extends; and assessors will ever be a set of petty tyrants, too unskilful, if honest, […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Alexander Hamilton · Economics · Politics & Law · The American Constitution

July 16th, 2021 · No Comments

“It is impossible to devise any specific tax, that will operate equally on the whole community. It must be the province of the legislature to hold the scales with a judicious hand and ballance one by another. The rich must be made to pay for their luxuries, which is the only proper way of taxing […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Alexander Hamilton · Economics · Politics & Law · The American Constitution

July 15th, 2021 · No Comments

“Experience will teach us, that no government costs so much as a bad one.” – Alexander Hamilton, “The Continentalist No. VI” Share this…FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedinemailPrint

[Read more →]

Tags: Alexander Hamilton · Economics · Politics & Law · The American Constitution

July 14th, 2021 · No Comments

“We may destroy our civilization, but we cannot escape it. We may savor a soured remorse at the growth of civilization, but that will yield us no large or lasting reward. There is no turning back: our only way is a radical struggle for the City of the Just.” – Irving Howe, “The City in […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Economics · Irving Howe · Lit & Crit · Politics & Law

July 13th, 2021 · No Comments

“I have come to be convinced that it is only the unbending observance of custom that sustains life in an urban circumstance.” – Gordon Lish, What I Know So Far Share this…FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedinemailPrint

[Read more →]

Tags: Gordon Lish · Lit & Crit

July 12th, 2021 · No Comments

“The suspicion of the city and all it represents seems to run so deeply in our culture that it would be impossible to eradicate it, even if anyone were naive enough to wish to. In its sophisticated variants it is a suspicion necessary for sanity, if only because modern civilization cannot yield very much to […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Irving Howe · Lit & Crit

July 11th, 2021 · No Comments

“The suspicion of artifice and cultivation, the belief in the superior moral and therapeutic uses of the ‘natural,’ the fear that corruption must follow upon a high civilization—such motifs appear to be strongly ingrained in Western Christianity and the civilization carrying it. There are Sodom and Gomorrah. There is the whore of Babylon. There is […]

[Read more →]

Tags: Irving Howe · Lit & Crit

July 10th, 2021 · No Comments

“In literature the natural is a category of artifice.” – Irving Howe, “The City in Literature” Share this…FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedinemailPrint

[Read more →]

Tags: Irving Howe · Lit & Crit