High Street 6.1 — Life During Wartime

“It seems to me sometimes that we never got used to being on this earth and life is just one great, ongoing, incomprehensible blunder.” — W. G. Sebald, The Rings of Saturn

High Street 6.1 — “Life During Wartime” is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 6.2 — “Life During Wartime” (cont.))

High Street 5.5 — Criminal Defense (fin.)

“Art is a commodity, art criticism is a commodity, the apple is a commodity, the air is a commodity, the ground under our feet is a commodity.  God is very much a commodity.  My emotions are a commodity, my desires the very locus of commodification.  My last illness is a commodity (twenty-two days at so much a day), my grave is a commodity (and not inexpensive).” — Donald Barthelme, “On the Level of Desire” (from Not-Knowing, ed. Herzinger)

High Street 5.5 — “Criminal Defense” (fin.) is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 6.1 — “Life During Wartime”)

High Street 5.4 — Criminal Defense (cont.)

“One of the pleasures of art is that it enables the mind to move in unanticipated directions, to make connections that may be in some sense errors but are fruitful nonetheless.” — Donald Barthelme, “Reifications” (from Not-Knowing, ed. Herzinger)

High Street 5.4 — “Criminal Defense” (cont.) is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 5.5 — “Criminal Defense” (fin.))

High Street 5.3 — Criminal Defense (cont.)

“One of the characteristics of the ideal is that it is always receding, slipping away from us, ungraspable.” — Donald Barthelme, “Nudes” (from Not-Knowing, ed. Herzinger)

High Street 5.3 — “Criminal Defense” (cont.) is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 5.4 — “Criminal Defense” (cont.))

High Street 5.2 — Criminal Defense (cont.)

“It is the vocation of the artist, the fiction writer, the playwright, and the poet, to create new language.” — Walker Percy, quoted in “A Symposium on Fiction” (from Not-Knowing, ed. Herzinger)

High Street 5.2 — “Criminal Defense” (cont.) is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 5.3 — “Criminal Defense” (cont.))

High Street 4.9 — Radio Stars and Hemp TV (fin.)

“Words get worn out, and instead of conveying meaning they act either as simulacra to conceal meaning or as if they were transparencies with no meaning.” — Walker Percy, quoted in “A Symposium on Fiction” (from Not-Knowing, ed. Herzinger)

High Street 4.9 — “Radio Stars and Hemp TV” (fin.) is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 5.1 — “Criminal Defense”)

High Street 4.8 — Radio Stars and Hemp TV (cont.)

“Not everything is unsayable in words, only the living truth.” — Eugene Ionesco, quoted in “A Symposium on Fiction” (from Not-Knowing, ed. Herzinger)

High Street 4.8 — “Radio Stars and Hemp TV” (cont.) is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 4.9 — “Radio Stars and Hemp TV” (fin.))

High Street 4.7 — Radio Stars and Hemp TV (cont.)

“It is no Disgrace to be Poor; it is simply Inconvenient.” — George Ade, from Fables in Slang

High Street 4.7 — “Radio Stars and Hemp TV” (cont.) is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 4.8 — “Radio Stars and Hemp TV” (cont.))

High Street 4.6 — Radio Stars and Hemp TV (cont.)

“A little thing may be perfect, but perfection is not a little thing.” — Thomas Bailey Aldrich (from The Cambridge History of English and American Literature, Vol. XVII, Ch. X, Sec. 3)

High Street 4.6 — “Radio Stars and Hemp TV” (cont.) is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 4.7 — “Radio Stars and Hemp TV” (cont.))

High Street 4.5 — Radio Stars and Hemp TV (cont.)

“Every writer in the country can write a beautiful sentence, or a hundred.  What I am interested in is the ugly sentence that is also somehow beautiful.  I agree that this is a highly-specialized enterprise.” — Donald Barthelme, “On ‘Paraguay’” (from Not-Knowing, ed. Herzinger)

High Street 4.5 — “Radio Stars and Hemp TV” (cont.) is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 4.6 — “Radio Stars and Hemp TV” (cont.))

High Street 4.4 — Radio Stars and Hemp TV (cont.)

“Art’s project is fundamentally meliorative.  The aim of meditating about the world is finally to change the world.  It is this meliorative aspect of literature that provides its ethical dimension.” — Donald Barthelme, “Not-Knowing” (from Not-Knowing, ed. Herzinger)

High Street 4.4 — “Radio Stars and Hemp TV” (cont.) is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 4.5 — “Radio Stars and Hemp TV” (cont.))

High Street 4.3 — Radio Stars and Hemp TV (cont.)

“Art cannot remain in one place.  A certain amount of movement, up, down, across, even a gallop toward the past, is a necessary precondition.” — Donald Barthelme, “Not-Knowing” (from Not-Knowing, ed. Herzinger)

High Street 4.3 — “Radio Stars and Hemp TV” (cont.) is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 4.4 — “Radio Stars and Hemp TV” (cont.))

High Street 4.2 — Radio Stars and Hemp TV (cont.)

“Art is a true account of the activity of mind.  Because consciousness, in Husserl’s formulation, is always consciousness of something, art thinks ever of the world, cannot not think of the world, could not turn its back on the world even if it wished to.” — Donald Barthelme, “Not-Knowing” (from Not-Knowing, ed. Herzinger, emphasis in original)

High Street 4.2 — “Radio Stars and Hemp TV” (cont.) is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 4.3 — “Radio Stars and Hemp TV” (cont.))

High Street 4.1 — Radio Stars and Hemp TV

“In reality, as we know, everything is always quite different.” — W. G. Sebald, Vertigo

High Street 4.1 — “Radio Stars and Hemp TV” is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 4.2 — “Radio Stars and Hemp TV” (cont.))

High Street 3.10 — Downhill Racing (fin.)

“Art is always a meditation upon external reality rather than a representation of external reality or a jackleg attempt to ‘be’ external reality.” — Donald Barthelme, “Not-Knowing” (from Not-Knowing, ed. Herzinger)

High Street 3.10 — “Downhill Racing” (fin.) is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 4.1 — “Radio Stars and Hemp TV”)

High Street 3.9 — Downhill Racing (cont.)

“When computers learn how to make jokes, artists will be in serious trouble.  But artists will respond in such a way as to make art impossible for the computer.  They will redefine art to take into account (that is, to exclude) technology–photography’s impact upon painting and painting’s brilliant response being a clear and comparatively recent example.” — Donald Barthelme, “Not-Knowing” (from Not-Knowing, ed. Herzinger)

High Street 3.9 — “Downhill Racing” (cont.) is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 3.10 — “Downhill Racing” (fin.))

High Street 3.8 — Downhill Racing (cont.)

“The combinatorial agility of words, the exponential generation of meaning once they’re allowed to go to bed together, allows the writer to surprise himself, makes art possible, reveals how much of Being we haven’t yet encountered.” — Donald Barthelme, “Not-Knowing” (from Not-Knowing, ed. Herzinger)

High Street 3.8 — “Downhill Racing” (cont.) is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 3.9 — “Downhill Racing” (cont.))

High Street 3.7 — Downhill Racing (cont.)

“The world enters the work as it enters our ordinary lives, not as world-view or system but in sharp particularity.” — Donald Barthelme, “Not-Knowing” (from Not-Knowing, ed. Herzinger)

High Street 3.7 — “Downhill Racing” (cont.) is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 3.8 — “Downhill Racing” (cont.))

High Street 3.6 — Downhill Racing (cont.)

“If the writer is taken to be the work’s way of getting itself written, a sort of lightning rod for an accumulation of atmospheric disturbances, a St. Sebastian absorbing in his tattered breast the arrows of the Zeitgeist, this changes not very much the traditional view of the artist.  But it does license a very great deal of critical imperialism.  This is fun for everyone.” — Donald Barthelme, “Not-Knowing” (from Not-Knowing, ed. Herzinger)

High Street 3.6 — “Downhill Racing” (cont.) is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 3.7 — “Downhill Racing” (cont.))

High Street 3.5 — Downhill Racing (cont.)

“Art is not difficult because it wishes to be difficult, but because it wishes to be art.” — Donald Barthelme, “Not-Knowing” (from Not-Knowing, ed. Herzinger)

High Street 3.5 — “Downhill Racing” (cont.) is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 3.6 — “Downhill Racing” (cont.))

High Street 3.4 — Downhill Racing (cont.)

“Not-knowing is crucial to art, is what permits art to be made.  Without the scanning process engendered by not-knowing, without the possibility of having the mind move in unanticipated directions, there would be no invention.” — Donald Barthelme, “Not-Knowing” (from Not-Knowing, ed. Herzinger)

High Street 3.4 — “Downhill Racing” (cont.) is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 3.5 — “Downhill Racing” (cont.))

High Street 3.3 — Downhill Racing (cont.)

“Play is one of the great possibilities of art.” — Donald Barthelme, “After Joyce” (from Not-Knowing, ed. Herzinger)

High Street 3.3 — “Downhill Racing” (cont.) is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 3.4 — “Downhill Racing” (cont.))

High Street 3.2 — Downhill Racing (cont.)

“What makes the literary object a work of art is the intention of the artist.” — Donald Barthelme, “After Joyce” (from Not-Knowing, ed. Herzinger)

High Street 3.2 — “Downhill Racing” (cont.) is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 3.3 — “Downhill Racing” (cont.))

High Street 2 — How to Get to High Street

“A full apprehension of man’s condition would drive him insane.” — Ernest Becker, The Denial of Death

High Street 2 — “How to Get to High Street” is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 3.1 — “Downhill Racing”)

High Street 1 — Breaking and Entering

“All that we can do in the face of that ineluctable defeat called life is to try to understand it.” — Milan Kundera, The Curtain

High Street 1 — “Breaking and Entering” is posted today.

(Tomorrow: High Street 2 — “How to Get to High Street”)

 

High Street 0 — Preface

“Man is so constituted that he reserves his strongest curses for the very things that keep him together and keep him alive.” — Thomas Bernhard, Concrete (trans. McLintock)

High Street 0 — “Preface” is posted today, at the top of the sidebar to your left.

(Tomorrow: High Street 1 — “Breaking and Entering”)

For your pleasure we offer kick-boxing or skeet-shooting

“Sometimes I think that there will be a place in the future for a literature the nature of which will singularly resemble that of a sport.  Let us subtract, from literary possibilities, everything which today, by the direct expression of things and the direct stimulation of the sensibility by new means–motion pictures, omnipresent music, etc.–is being rendered useless or ineffective for the art of language.  Let us also subtract a whole category of subjects–psychological, sociological, etc.–which the growing precision of the sciences will render it difficult to treat freely.  There will remain to letters a private domain: that of symbolic expression and of imaginative values due to the free combination of the elements of language.” — Paul Valery (quoted in “After Joyce,” from Not-Knowing, ed. Herzinger)