The Art of Tetman Callis

Some of the stories and poems may be inappropriate for persons under 16

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Entries Tagged as 'The Great War'

A committee of the whole

January 31st, 2015 · No Comments

“You look at a dozen men, each of them not by any means detestable and not uninteresting, for each of them would have technical details of their affairs to impart; you formed them into a Government or a club and at once, with oppressions, inaccuracies, gossip, backbiting, lying, corruptions and vileness, you had the combination […]

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Tags: Ford Madox Ford · Lit & Crit · Politics & Law · The Great War

Not necessarily in that order

January 29th, 2015 · No Comments

“Disasters come to men through drink, bankruptcy, and women.” – Ford Madox Ford, Some Do Not… Share this…FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedinemailPrint

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Tags: Ford Madox Ford · Lit & Crit · The Great War

Death was their life

January 27th, 2015 · No Comments

“On the next floor below are the abdominal and spine cases, head wounds and double amputations. On the right side of the wing are the jaw wounds, gas cases, nose, ear, and neck wounds. On the left the blind and the lung wounds, pelvis wounds, wounds in the joints, wounds in the kidneys, wounds in […]

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Tags: Erich Maria Remarque · Lit & Crit · The Great War

Dancing with Mr. D

January 26th, 2015 · No Comments

“We go up the line again. On the way we pass through a devastated wood with the tree trunks shattered and the ground ploughed up. At several places there are tremendous craters. ‘Great guns, something’s hit that,’ I say to Kat. ‘Trench mortars,’ he replies, and then points up at one of the trees. In […]

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Tags: Erich Maria Remarque · Lit & Crit · The Great War

Unending fodder

January 25th, 2015 · No Comments

“I am often on guard over the Russians. In the darkness one sees their forms move like sick storks, like great birds. They come close up to the wire fence and lean their faces against it; their fingers hook round the mesh. Often many stand side by side, and breathe the wind that comes down […]

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Tags: Erich Maria Remarque · Lit & Crit · The Great War

The things they left behind

January 24th, 2015 · No Comments

“In my room behind the table stands a brown leather sofa. I sit down on it. On the walls are pinned countless pictures that I once used to cut out of the newspapers. In between are drawings and postcards that have pleased me. In the corner is a small iron stove. Against the wall opposite […]

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Tags: Erich Maria Remarque · Lit & Crit · The Great War

You don’t want to know this

January 23rd, 2015 · No Comments

“Bombardment, barrage, curtain-fire, mines, gas, tanks, machine-guns, hand-grenades–words, words, but they hold the horror of the world . . . . We see men living with their skulls blown open; we see soldiers run with their two feet cut off, they stagger on their splintered stumps into the next shell-hole; a lance-corporal crawls a mile […]

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Tags: Erich Maria Remarque · Lit & Crit · The Great War

Mother, may I?

January 21st, 2015 · No Comments

“To no man does the earth mean so much as to the soldier. When he presses himself down upon her long and powerfully, when he buries his face and his limbs deep in her from the fear of death by shell-fire, then she is his only friend, his brother, his mother; he stifles his terror […]

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Tags: Erich Maria Remarque · Lit & Crit · The Great War

Get ’em while they’re young and tender

January 20th, 2015 · No Comments

“When we went to the district-commandant to enlist, we were a class of twenty young men, many of whom proudly shaved for the first time before going to the barracks. We had no definite plans for our future. Our thoughts of a career and occupation were as yet of too unpractical a character to furnish […]

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Tags: Erich Maria Remarque · Lit & Crit · The Great War

Easy to lift and carry

January 18th, 2015 · No Comments

“Men talk much and importantly about principles but they agree upon them much more readily than they do upon details because, perhaps, they hold theoretical principles so much more lightly than they hold practical details.” – Brand Whitlock, Belgium: A Personal Narrative Share this…FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedinemailPrint

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Tags: Brand Whitlock · Lit & Crit · Politics & Law · The Great War

It goes way back and way deep

January 17th, 2015 · No Comments

“Among the moral forces, exists there one superior to justice? This dominates all. Old as humanity, eternal as the need of man and of people to be and to feel themselves protected, it is at the base of all civilization. Art and Science are its tributaries. Religions live and prosper in its shadow. Is it […]

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Tags: Brand Whitlock · Politics & Law · The Great War

A knight in shining paper

January 16th, 2015 · No Comments

“A lawyer is not only a professional competent to represent the interest of parties before justice and to defend in a courteous and honourable struggle the interests of the client: he is a necessary auxiliary of the judge, to whom he brings his learning, his probity, and his labour.” – Leon Theodor, Bâtonnier of the […]

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Tags: Brand Whitlock · Politics & Law · The Great War

Better rashness than inertia; better a mistake than hesitation

January 15th, 2015 · No Comments

“A favorable situation will never be exploited if commanders wait for orders.  The highest commander and the youngest soldier must always be conscious of the fact that omission and inactivity are worse than resorting to the wrong expedient.” – General Helmuth Karl Bernard von Moltke (as quoted by Trevor N. Dupuy in A Genius for […]

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Tags: The Great War · The Second World War

And is to be attended to

January 12th, 2015 · No Comments

“Truth is often exasperating in her deliberate movements and not to be hurried but she always arrives calm and unflushed at her destination.” – Brand Whitlock, Belgium: A Personal Narrative Share this…FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedinemailPrint

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Tags: Brand Whitlock · Lit & Crit · Politics & Law · The Great War

Plain speech

January 9th, 2015 · No Comments

“The monuments say Not in Vain and Glory and Sacrifice. But the rows of identical white stones say simply Death, and Death, and more Death.” – Samuel Hynes, “Verdun and Back: A Pilot’s Log” Share this…FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedinemailPrint

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Tags: The Great War

Twenty thousand dead on one summer’s day

January 8th, 2015 · No Comments

“The Somme—or rather the first day of the battle—lingers in memory as an intensely sad affair, a monumental loss of innocence not only for the British Army, but for Britain itself, and the world. Those tragic, cheering ranks of ‘Pal’ and ‘Chums’ battalions hurled into eternity with the fluid sweep of the machine gun cannot […]

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Tags: The Great War

Too late now

January 5th, 2015 · 2 Comments

“There is this terrible and fatal quality in all writing, which should no doubt adjure us all to silence—namely, that, no matter how imperfect a picture the writer gives of everything else, he always draws a perfect portrait of himself.” – Brand Whitlock, Belgium: A Personal Narrative Share this…FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedinemailPrint

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Tags: Brand Whitlock · Lit & Crit · The Great War

It was not entirely calculated

January 4th, 2015 · No Comments

“The origins of the annihilation of the German Jews were much more remote in time than the events of Krystallnacht. They are to be found in popular reactions to the dislocations that accompanied Germany’s belated but headlong rise as an industrial Power in the nineteenth century and in the growth of a virulent form of […]

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Tags: Adolf Hitler · Economics · Gordon A. Craig · Lit & Crit · Politics & Law · The Great War · The Second World War

Not how to win a modern war

December 30th, 2014 · No Comments

“After a hasty lunch we made off to Dinant, still following the Meuse. The thin line of houses down the course of the river were thinner than they were a few months ago, and there were signs of suffering and distress everywhere. I had never been to Dinant before, but had seen pictures of it […]

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Tags: Hugh Gibson · Lit & Crit · The Great War

When the Germans came to town

December 29th, 2014 · No Comments

“The Burgomaster came into the restaurant to find us, and offered to go on with us to Visé, to show us the town, and we were glad to have him, as he knows the place like the palm of his hand. I had been through Visé twice, and had marvelled at the completeness of the […]

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Tags: Hugh Gibson · Lit & Crit · The Great War

Pragmatism in action

December 28th, 2014 · No Comments

“Marshal Langhorne came in to-day from The Hague to effect formal delivery of the first bargeload of food, and had weird tales to tell of his adventures by the way. Thank goodness, the first of the food has arrived in time, and if the flow can be kept up, the worst of our troubles will […]

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Tags: Hugh Gibson · Lit & Crit · The Great War

King and Queen of the immense nation of Sorrow

December 27th, 2014 · No Comments

“As soon as we had got through, I had to start back for my audience of the Queen. W.—– took me out to la Panne, where we found the Villa on the sand dunes, a little way back of the lines. There were a couple of gendarmes on duty, the King’s Secretary, and the Countess […]

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Tags: Hugh Gibson · Lit & Crit · The Great War

Don’t think they wouldn’t do it

December 26th, 2014 · No Comments

“In the course of a visit to General von Lüttwitz to-day, one of the colleagues remarked that the Germans must keep the Belgians alive, and could not allow them to starve. Lüttwitz was not at all of that mind, for he said with some show of feeling: ‘The allies are at liberty to feed the […]

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Tags: Hugh Gibson · Lit & Crit · The Great War

Lads thirsty for blood of all types

December 24th, 2014 · No Comments

“The way the German army cleaned out the wine of the country was a revelation to everybody. They would not take what they needed for the day’s drinking but would clear out whole cellars at a time and load what was not drunk onto carts to be carried away. The result was that people who […]

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Tags: Hugh Gibson · Lit & Crit · The Great War

And we thought they fought only for beer and slaughter

December 23rd, 2014 · No Comments

“Count and Countess de X—– had an interesting story to tell of their experiences when the first armies went through. When the war broke out they were at their château and were caught by the first onrush of troops. Their fine cellars were emptied for the benefit of the invader, but nothing more serious happened […]

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Tags: Hugh Gibson · Lit & Crit · The Great War

And dead they remain to this day

December 22nd, 2014 · No Comments

“When I got back to the Legation, I found a nice Belgian who had no request to make of us, but wanted to tell his story to somebody, and a terrible story it was, too. He had fitted up his château near Mons as a Red Cross hospital. During the battle there a week ago, […]

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Tags: Hugh Gibson · Lit & Crit · The Great War

Modern war comes to old town

December 18th, 2014 · No Comments

“The boulevards were deserted save for the troops coming back into the town [Louvain]. New houses were burning that had been intact in the afternoon. After passing the Porte de Tirlemont, we began to see people again—little groups that had come out into the streets through a craving for company, and stood huddled together listening […]

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Tags: Hugh Gibson · Lit & Crit · The Great War

The end of the old world

December 17th, 2014 · No Comments

“I stopped at the Palace to sign the King’s book, and ran into General Jungbluth, who was just starting off with the Queen. She came down the stairs and stopped just long enough to greet me, and then went her way; she is a brave little woman and deserves a better fate than she has […]

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Tags: Hugh Gibson · Lit & Crit · The Great War

The race to make life pointless

December 16th, 2014 · No Comments

“Both squadrons were now steaming southward on slightly converging courses—the British to seaward with the setting sun behind them, and the Germans nearer the land. And now began the saddest naval action in the war. Of the officers and men in both the squadrons that faced each other in these stormy seas so far from […]

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Tags: Lit & Crit · The Great War · Winston Churchill

The second is to keep your head down

December 15th, 2014 · No Comments

“The first rule of war is to concentrate superior strength for decisive action and to avoid division of forces or engaging in detail.” – Winston Churchill, The World Crisis Share this…FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedinemailPrint

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Tags: Lit & Crit · The Great War · Winston Churchill